Corn

Resource Library

  • Publications
  • Articles
  • Videos
  • News
  • Events

    Insuring Corn and Other Spring Crops

    With producers evaluating marketing strategies and the looming March 15 insurance sales deadline, several trends are emerging. By monitoring these trends, producers may be able to refine their marketing plans for corn, soybeans and spring wheat. New crop futures prices are tallied during February and their average during the month determines the projected price for insurance purposes.

    Read More »

    USDA Provides New Cost Share Opportunities for Organic Producers & Handlers

    In recent times, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has shown increased interest in organic agriculture. As a result, on December 21, 2016, the USDA announced that starting March 20, 2017, organic producers and handlers will be able to visit over 2,100 USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices across the country to apply for federal reimbursement to assist with the cost of receiving and maintaining organic or transitional certification.

    Read More »

    Yield Goal… Truly Defined

    Whether it’s over a cup of coffee in December or back in the combine at harvest, yield is on the producer’s mind. In the spring, goals are set, plans are made, and crops are planted. Although plans are carefully drawn, we never know what might happen during a given growing season. Having measurable, specific goals for your business is always a good idea, and one of the most important goals is maximizing yields.

    Read More »

    Estimating Corn Yield in the Field

    As a result of inconsistent weather conditions, we have observed much variation between corn fields across South Dakota than in previous years. While the Western and Northeastern part of the state faced persistent water deficit conditions, Southeastern S.D. saw high rainfall early in the season which delayed planting across this region. Even on high productive land, it is expected for corn yields to vary significantly across the state. Estimating corn grain yield prior to harvest can help growers make management decisions, especially storage and marketing.

    Read More »

    Chopping Corn for Silage is on its Way

    Dry conditions are still affecting forage production throughout the state of South Dakota. Dealing with drought conditions when feeding dairy and beef cattle can bring serious challenges to production including a short or unavailable hay supply in Western areas of the state.

    Read More »

    2016 South Dakota Oral Leases Renew September 1st

    On September 1, 2016, all oral leases for agriculture ground in South Dakota will automatically renew. The automatic renewal includes all the current terms and conditions in the existing lease, including but not limited to: who the land is rented to, when payment is due, the per acre rate, stipulations for grazing, hunting or other land use restrictions, and any weed control or fencing agreements, etc.

    Read More »

    Heat Exhaustion & Stroke: Protecting yourself and your employees

    For those whose livelihood depends upon working outdoors or in less than favorable conditions, the coming weeks look to be quite difficult with higher than normal temperatures and humidity predicted. For example, cows still need to be milked and fed, barns are not air conditioned, even though there is emphasis on cow comfort through ventilation and cooling, we sometimes get lax on also protecting ourselves and employees from the effects of heat.

    Read More »

    Maximize Your Best Asset – Your Employees

    There never seems to be a slow time around a farm or ranch. The to do list is always there, and as a result farm owners and managers who oversee employees and or work alongside family members sometimes can overlook how important it is to allocate time to enhance the skills and abilities of those who work for you. There are great opportunities year round, such as tours, field days and seminars employers can take advantage of as continued educational opportunities for your employees.

    Read More »

    Tips for Reducing Conflict During Agriculture’s Busy Time

    For those involved in the day-to-day workings of agriculture you know things are getting busier and busier as we move into spring. Calving season is in full swing meaning late night checks or even a 3 a.m. wake up call to make sure all is fine. Those involved in crop production are preparing equipment and making the necessary final seed orders to be ready to hit the field as soon as possible. The result is long days ahead for agricultural producers, their employees and families. In times like these, stress builds, tempers can get short and adequate communication can oftentimes fall by the wayside.

    Read More »

    The South Dakota Wetland Exchange

    According to the South Dakota Farm Bureau, a proposal currently under review by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) may soon create the framework for South Dakota’s first agricultural wetland mitigation bank. Wayne Smith, Wetlands & Land Use Specialist with the SD Farm Bureau, explained that the process began in 2014 when the Bureau received a SD NRCS Conservation Innovation Grant (CIG) to create the framework under which a mitigation bank would operate. That product was turned back over to SD NRCS in September 2015, which has since been elevated to Washington D.C. for review and approval.

    Read More »

    Compared to What? Interpreting Research Results

    In this information age, farmers may find it challenging to identify trustable sources. There are many companies trying to sell products attached to claims that may or may not be true. It is important for farmers to find a path through the hype and be able to determine if a product will benefit them or not. Statistical analysis is one way to separate fact from fiction.

    Read More »

    Crop Planting Guide: Soil Temperature & Germination

    Successful crop production to maximize profitability starts at planting. Selecting the best cultivar, preparing seed bed, maintaining optimum crop nutrient needs, and seeding at appropriate rates, date, and time are just a few variables a farmer considers during each planting season. Regardless of where you are located, it is hard to go out and plant on a pre-determined date because of year-to-year weather variability.

    Read More »

    Proper Laundering: Insecticide-contaminated clothing

    Individuals working with insecticides must take important steps to prevent exposure to themselves and others. This includes reading the label, wearing proper personal protective equipment (PPE), exercising caution when mixing and applying insecticides, disposing of used PPE, and laundering potentially contaminated clothing.

    Read More »

    Insecticide Safety: What gloves are right for the job?

    When handling insecticides it is important to wear the proper personal protective equipment (PPE). Insecticide labels provide the minimum PPE requirements that must be worn when handling containers, spraying, mixing, loading, or conducting maintenance on the sprayer. Chemical resistant gloves are listed as required PPE for almost all insecticide related activities. Wearing the proper gloves when handling insecticide products prevents exposure to the skin on the hands. Insecticides can penetrate skin on different parts of the body to varying degrees.

    Read More »

    Fumigant Safety: The difference between life and death

    Fumigants are used to manage insect pests in agricultural fields, grain storage facilities, and residential environments. These products are considered restricted use. Individuals must have a valid South Dakota commercial or private applicator license to purchase and apply restricted use products. It is important to remember that fumigants are toxic chemicals – in addition to killing the intended pest, they can harm humans if used improperly.

    Read More »

    Soil Health Principles

    Soil health is a very important natural resource concern; however, knowledge of how to build soil health is not widespread. The principles of soil health should be addressed as often as possible. At a recent South Dakota Soil Health Challenge meeting in Mitchell, Jay Fuhrer (USDA-NRCS) presented his five principles of soil health: 1. Soil Armor,  2. Minimizing Soil Disturbance, 3. Plant Diversity, 4. Continual live plant root and 5. Livestock Integration.

    Read More »

    Obtaining Private Applicator Certification or Recertification in S.D.

    Certification courses and exams are available for new and existing private pesticide applicators. Individuals needing to become certified or recertified are encouraged to attend one of the 3-hour private applicator sessions hosted throughout the state. The dates and locations of these sessions can be found in this article.

    Read More »

    USDA Provides New Cost Share Opportunities for Organic Producers & Handlers

    In recent times, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has shown increased interest in organic agriculture. As a result, on December 21, 2016, the USDA announced that starting March 20, 2017, organic producers and handlers will be able to visit over 2,100 USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices across the country to apply for federal reimbursement to assist with the cost of receiving and maintaining organic or transitional certification.

    Read More »

    Yield Goal… Truly Defined

    Whether it’s over a cup of coffee in December or back in the combine at harvest, yield is on the producer’s mind. In the spring, goals are set, plans are made, and crops are planted. Although plans are carefully drawn, we never know what might happen during a given growing season. Having measurable, specific goals for your business is always a good idea, and one of the most important goals is maximizing yields.

    Read More »

    Palmer Amaranth: Threat to South Dakota agriculture

    Annual weeds are threat to many cropping systems in South Dakota. Palmer amaranth is a newer threat in the state depending upon your geographical location. Confirmed sightings in a few counties in South Dakota include Potter, Sully, Hughes, Lyman, Bennett, Buffalo and Douglas. These are confirmed sightings and there could be other counties as well that could have Palmer amaranth in the state. Most Palmer plants found in South Dakota originated from a contaminated source, such as contaminated machinery, seed or manure. Palmer is an invasive annual plant originally from the southwestern U.S. with male and female plants.

    Read More »

    Proper Laundering: Insecticide-contaminated clothing

    Individuals working with insecticides must take important steps to prevent exposure to themselves and others. This includes reading the label, wearing proper personal protective equipment (PPE), exercising caution when mixing and applying insecticides, disposing of used PPE, and laundering potentially contaminated clothing.

    Read More »

    Insecticide Safety: What gloves are right for the job?

    When handling insecticides it is important to wear the proper personal protective equipment (PPE). Insecticide labels provide the minimum PPE requirements that must be worn when handling containers, spraying, mixing, loading, or conducting maintenance on the sprayer. Chemical resistant gloves are listed as required PPE for almost all insecticide related activities. Wearing the proper gloves when handling insecticide products prevents exposure to the skin on the hands. Insecticides can penetrate skin on different parts of the body to varying degrees.

    Read More »

    Fumigant Safety: The difference between life and death

    Fumigants are used to manage insect pests in agricultural fields, grain storage facilities, and residential environments. These products are considered restricted use. Individuals must have a valid South Dakota commercial or private applicator license to purchase and apply restricted use products. It is important to remember that fumigants are toxic chemicals – in addition to killing the intended pest, they can harm humans if used improperly.

    Read More »

    Obtaining Private Applicator Certification or Recertification in S.D.

    Certification courses and exams are available for new and existing private pesticide applicators. Individuals needing to become certified or recertified are encouraged to attend one of the 3-hour private applicator sessions hosted throughout the state. The dates and locations of these sessions can be found in this article.

    Read More »

    2017 Pest Management Guides Released

    The South Dakota 2017 Pest Management guides are available online as free PDF downloads or as hard copies at SDSU Extension Regional Centers, offices, and events. The guides provide recommendations for herbicides, insecticides, seed treatments, and fungicides that are available in South Dakota to control weeds, insects, and diseases in a variety of crops.

    Read More »

    Preventative Measures for Stored Grain Pests

    As harvest rapidly approaches, it is time to inspect grain storage facilities and conduct pre-harvest bin maintenance. These preventive measures can prevent insects and other pests from infesting the new crop of stored grain during the fall. Although the majority of scouting for insect pests occurs during the summer, it also must continue until the grain is marketed and delivered.

    Read More »

    Agricultural Water Testing Project

    Subsurface drainage water can look clean to the eye when coming out the end of a pipe. However, it doesn’t always mean it is. Tile water can carry with it high concentrations of dissolved nutrients such as nitrate-nitrogen which can contribute to the eutrophication of surface water. Eutrophication can be defined as the enrichment of a water body with nutrients; stimulating the growth of aquatic plants and depleting the dissolved oxygen content of the water as the plants decompose.

    Read More »

    Soil Health Principles

    Soil health is a very important natural resource concern; however, knowledge of how to build soil health is not widespread. The principles of soil health should be addressed as often as possible. At a recent South Dakota Soil Health Challenge meeting in Mitchell, Jay Fuhrer (USDA-NRCS) presented his five principles of soil health: 1. Soil Armor,  2. Minimizing Soil Disturbance, 3. Plant Diversity, 4. Continual live plant root and 5. Livestock Integration.

    Read More »

    Soil Testing Labs

    Crop Producers, agronomists, gardeners, homeowners and anyone else who is thinking about taking soil samples this fall or next spring need to be aware that South Dakota State University no longer offers commercial testing. (Effective Oct, 2011). Below is a list of nearby state or private laboratories that can be used for crop production fields, gardens and lawns. The private laboratories are not necessarily recommended or endorsed, however many will give university recommendations when asked. Crop producers, agronomists, gardeners, and home owners with questions on sample submissions, analysis charges and recommendations should contact the laboratory of interest.

    Read More »

    Cover Crop Adoption: Farmers’ perceived benefits & barriers

    Cover crops are generally defined as crops planted between cash crops to cover and protect the soil. Some demonstrated benefits of cover crops include: reduced soil erosion, increased soil organic matter, increased biological diversity, increased nitrogen supply, and weed control. Depending on the farmers’ objectives, different species of cover crops can be planted. For example, if a farmer’s main objective is to increase nitrogen supply, then legume cover crops best suited to the farm area should be selected.

    Read More »

    Gypsum Misconceptions

    The consideration of gypsum as a soil amendment has become a popular topic in crop production agriculture. However, correctly understanding the chemical function of gypsum and lime in soil is needed to properly place this amendment. Gypsum, which is calcium sulfate after applied to the soil and dissolved in the water it disassociates into calcium and sulfate.

    Read More »

    New SDSU Extension report provides status of native grasslands & woodlands in Eastern S.D.

    SDSU Extension, in partnership with a variety of non-government, state, and federal agencies, has recently released a public report on the status of native plant communities in Eastern South Dakota. The report is based on a comprehensive look at the Eastern South Dakota landscape that incorporated the use of field and tract-level historic Farm Service Agency (FSA) cropland history, coupled with high resolution aerial photographs provided through the USDA National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP).

    Read More »

    “Tighty Whities”

    Soil is probably our most important natural resource. It is the foundation or factory for producing food. Without healthy soil, the system eventually fails; many civilizations in history have risen and fallen with the over-exploitation and demise of their soil resources. Soil offers several services for plant and animal production that include providing an anchor for healthy plant roots, offering essential plant nutrient uptake, supplying water storage, and cycling and storing carbon and other nutrients for improved and sustained plant growth in future years. 

    Read More »

    Soil Health Farming Practices: “Merit or Myth”?

    No-till farming practices, diverse crop rotations, cover crops and integrating livestock into crop production require a different kind of management when compared with conventional farming.  Although most crop and livestock producers have a good idea of the desired outcomes that center on improved soil health, achieving these is not always easy. Somewhere, in most producers’ history, practices such as no-till that favor improved soil health may have been attempted.

    Read More »

    Creative Tillage

    In a number of tilled fields this fall there appears to be an attempt to improve soil health. Creative or recreational tillage has been applied to certain upland areas of some fields to possibly control rill and gully erosion while drainage ways were not tilled. The thought process behind the tillage pattern used in the picture assumes that water will run-off the steeper slopes and the absence of tillage in the waterways will slow or prevent gully erosion. This is only a Band-Aid approach to solving a bigger problem with water infiltration into the soil on hill slopes and waterways.

    Read More »

    Keep Carbon in the Picture: Modifying the cut and carry system

    After a recent trip to Ethiopia, I began thinking about how farming on the steep, terraced hillsides of the rural highlands there might relate to agriculture across the rolling plains of South Dakota. As part of the Farmer-to-Farmer Program, jointly sponsored by USAID and Catholic Relief Services, I had the opportunity to speak with nearly 300 smallholder farmers about fertility and soil health.

    Read More »

    Five Tips on Time Management

    Have you ever heard anyone say they are not busy? I am guessing not. No matter how much technology we have at our finger tips or improved ways to complete an agricultural related task, you won’t find many people saying they don’t have their plate full or even over-flowing. Heavy workloads, and the feeling of being overwhelmed or stressed does not may our days very enjoyable. Is the reason for always seeming busy a time management issue? and learning some important tips to help your organize your time and help with focus.

    Read More »

    Three ways to understand difficult people

    Managers and supervisors have many challenges to deal with daily in order to strive to help their company reach goals, be productive, and profitable. One of these challenges is dealing with difficult people. Their ability to lead difficult employees, which create an unproductive working environment and shift the employee into a high performing worker is an important skill for managers.

    Read More »

    Compared to What? Interpreting Research Results

    In this information age, farmers may find it challenging to identify trustable sources. There are many companies trying to sell products attached to claims that may or may not be true. It is important for farmers to find a path through the hype and be able to determine if a product will benefit them or not. Statistical analysis is one way to separate fact from fiction.

    Read More »

    Four Steps to Clear Communication

    The greatest challenge with communication is remembering to do so! Busy times around farms, ranches and agri-business companies, lend us to often forget to actually communicate with those we work with. We think— I’ll just send a text and they will know what project I’m working on. A text can definitely provide an update, but when communication calls for a face-to-face discussion, how can one build an environment conducive to effective communication?

    Read More »

    Agricultural Generational Communications: Part 2

    As we continue with the series on ‘Agricultural Generational Communications’, we introduced you to a mock farm called “ABC Farm” consisting of senior generation, 71-yr-old (John) who started the farming business, his son (Tom) a 51-yr-old, farming alongside his dad for nearly 25 years, and grandson/son 24-year old (Brandon) who returned to the farm after completing college. This farm example will be used to provide tips on working across generations in agriculture.

    Read More »

    Generator Preparedness

    For many homeowners a power outage may be viewed as just and inconvenience with some potential repair cost associated with it. But for a lot of livestock operations, a power outage has the potential to be a very costly event. Although we are not able to control the weather, there are things we can do to be prepared when we are struck with a power outage. If you don’t have a generator but are thinking you would like to have one for when the power goes out, don’t wait till the power goes out to purchase one.

    Read More »

    Do as I say and not as I do…

    How many times have you heard this? In regards to our communities and agricultural development we all need to remember that we are all under public scrutiny. Our actions whether a small or large producer can have monumental impact as we move forward with agriculture being the forefront of an economic base within communities and the state.

    Read More »

    Agricultural Generational Communications: Part 1

    Since generational operations are primarily family members, we assume we know all there is to know about each other, right? On the surface we probably do know some key characteristics or preferences of family members, but is that the same as knowing them at a level of working alongside or reporting to them on a daily basis.

    Read More »

    Holidays: A Time for Generations

    The holiday season is time for family. It’s an opportunity to celebrate the holidays, reunite and spend time together due to busy schedules throughout the year or who may be spread many miles apart. Historically, in agriculture farm families make up the greatest percentage of business ownership, many of which are generational family operations, two or three generations of family working side-by-side daily to produce agricultural products.

    Read More »

    Three Steps to Modeling Leadership

    Are you interested in learning practices you can implement to improve your ability to serve in a leadership role? Maybe you recently have been appointed or found yourself willing to serve in a leadership role or you aim to someday serve in a leadership capacity. Despite the situation, research has indicated there are three steps you can practice to help build your initial leadership abilities. Remember leadership is learned and ultimate leaders continue to practice their craft.

    Read More »

    Sign Up For Email!

    • Field Staff Listing
    • South Dakota 4HOnline