Corn Article Archive

USDA Provides New Cost Share Opportunities for Organic Producers & Handlers

In recent times, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has shown increased interest in organic agriculture. As a result, on December 21, 2016, the USDA announced that starting March 20, 2017, organic producers and handlers will be able to visit over 2,100 USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices across the country to apply for federal reimbursement to assist with the cost of receiving and maintaining organic or transitional certification.

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Gypsum Misconceptions

The consideration of gypsum as a soil amendment has become a popular topic in crop production agriculture. However, correctly understanding the chemical function of gypsum and lime in soil is needed to properly place this amendment. Gypsum, which is calcium sulfate after applied to the soil and dissolved in the water it disassociates into calcium and sulfate.

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Obtaining Private Applicator Certification or Recertification in S.D.

Certification courses and exams are available for new and existing private pesticide applicators. Individuals needing to become certified or recertified are encouraged to attend one of the 3-hour private applicator sessions hosted throughout the state. The dates and locations of these sessions can be found in this article.

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Yield Goal… Truly Defined

Whether it’s over a cup of coffee in December or back in the combine at harvest, yield is on the producer’s mind. In the spring, goals are set, plans are made, and crops are planted. Although plans are carefully drawn, we never know what might happen during a given growing season. Having measurable, specific goals for your business is always a good idea, and one of the most important goals is maximizing yields.

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“Tighty Whities”

Soil is probably our most important natural resource. It is the foundation or factory for producing food. Without healthy soil, the system eventually fails; many civilizations in history have risen and fallen with the over-exploitation and demise of their soil resources. Soil offers several services for plant and animal production that include providing an anchor for healthy plant roots, offering essential plant nutrient uptake, supplying water storage, and cycling and storing carbon and other nutrients for improved and sustained plant growth in future years. 

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Soil Health Farming Practices: “Merit or Myth”?

No-till farming practices, diverse crop rotations, cover crops and integrating livestock into crop production require a different kind of management when compared with conventional farming.  Although most crop and livestock producers have a good idea of the desired outcomes that center on improved soil health, achieving these is not always easy. Somewhere, in most producers’ history, practices such as no-till that favor improved soil health may have been attempted.

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Creative Tillage

In a number of tilled fields this fall there appears to be an attempt to improve soil health. Creative or recreational tillage has been applied to certain upland areas of some fields to possibly control rill and gully erosion while drainage ways were not tilled. The thought process behind the tillage pattern used in the picture assumes that water will run-off the steeper slopes and the absence of tillage in the waterways will slow or prevent gully erosion. This is only a Band-Aid approach to solving a bigger problem with water infiltration into the soil on hill slopes and waterways.

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Herbicide History Determines Seed Purchases

Although 2016 row-crop harvest is still underway, many seed suppliers have started promoting ‘early bird’ incentives on next year’s seed purchases. We all like a good deal when we see one, but it’s important to keep track of field history, and think about your future crop rotation before making decisions.

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