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    2015 Alfalfa Variety Trials

    We are pleased to announce that the 2015 Alfalfa Variety Trials Report is now available! The objectives of the alfalfa variety trials for SDSU Extension were to develop unbiased research results for better estimates on which alfalfa varieties work better under specific environmental conditions. This work performed at the Northeast Research farm, near South Shore, and at a second location near Redfield, South Dakota will continue for several years as more locations are being included.

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    Understanding Conservation Easements

    Conservation easements are a common, yet often misunderstood, real estate transaction tool. This article is intended to provide factual information regarding the rules and regulations that govern the use of conservation easements in South Dakota. Source citations include references to both direct sources and compilations that include additional references to law, case law, and easement publications.

    Read More »

    NRCS Cropping Systems Inventory: Landowner & agency cooperation important for soil health

    South Dakota NRCS State Conservationist Jeff Zimprich announced on December 1st the release of the latest South Dakota Cropping Systems Inventory (formerly referred to as the “CTIC residue management survey”) at the joint annual meeting of Ag Horizons and the South Dakota Association of Conservation Districts. The data contained in this inventory is valuable to anyone participating in agriculture and natural resource conservation in South Dakota.

    Read More »

    Weather Offers Extended Opportunity for Fall Weed Control

    Fall can be an excellent time to control many winter annuals like penny cress, shepherds purse, prickly lettuce, downy brome and marestail. Most years the window for applying herbicides in South Dakota is finished by early November. This year, however, climatologists are suggesting that we may not have a hard freeze in South Dakota for another couple of weeks. This weather will give winter annuals the opportunity to continue to germinate and grow.

    Read More »

    Latest First Fall Frost Dates

    As the warm fall season continues in October, gardens are still producing and fall planting and harvest activities are in full swing. A pattern of warmer than average weather is upon us. Most of the state still has not seen much frost, let alone a hard freeze, which begs the question, when is the latest first freeze we have seen in South Dakota?

    Read More »

    Prevention of Stored Grain Pests

    With harvest just around the corner it is time to start thinking about pre-harvest bin maintenance and ultimately preventing the new crop of stored grain from being infested by insects. Unfortunately, scouting and management decisions don’t stop once the crop is harvested, and actually continue until it is sold and delivered.

    Read More »

    Perennial Vegetation Reclaims Salt Affected Soil

    Salt affected soils have become a significant soil health problem in many regions of South Dakota, especially in the James River Valley. The salts causing this problem are naturally occurring and were deposited in the landscape long ago. These salts contains calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and sulfate. The salts are being redistributed in the landscape due to higher than usual precipitation than in the past and cropping systems that don’t use significant soil water during the whole growing season.

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    Understanding Conservation Easements

    Conservation easements are a common, yet often misunderstood, real estate transaction tool. This article is intended to provide factual information regarding the rules and regulations that govern the use of conservation easements in South Dakota. Source citations include references to both direct sources and compilations that include additional references to law, case law, and easement publications.

    Read More »

    NRCS Cropping Systems Inventory: Landowner & agency cooperation important for soil health

    South Dakota NRCS State Conservationist Jeff Zimprich announced on December 1st the release of the latest South Dakota Cropping Systems Inventory (formerly referred to as the “CTIC residue management survey”) at the joint annual meeting of Ag Horizons and the South Dakota Association of Conservation Districts. The data contained in this inventory is valuable to anyone participating in agriculture and natural resource conservation in South Dakota.

    Read More »

    Weather Offers Extended Opportunity for Fall Weed Control

    Fall can be an excellent time to control many winter annuals like penny cress, shepherds purse, prickly lettuce, downy brome and marestail. Most years the window for applying herbicides in South Dakota is finished by early November. This year, however, climatologists are suggesting that we may not have a hard freeze in South Dakota for another couple of weeks. This weather will give winter annuals the opportunity to continue to germinate and grow.

    Read More »

    Latest First Fall Frost Dates

    As the warm fall season continues in October, gardens are still producing and fall planting and harvest activities are in full swing. A pattern of warmer than average weather is upon us. Most of the state still has not seen much frost, let alone a hard freeze, which begs the question, when is the latest first freeze we have seen in South Dakota?

    Read More »

    Prevention of Stored Grain Pests

    With harvest just around the corner it is time to start thinking about pre-harvest bin maintenance and ultimately preventing the new crop of stored grain from being infested by insects. Unfortunately, scouting and management decisions don’t stop once the crop is harvested, and actually continue until it is sold and delivered.

    Read More »

    Rust Diseases on the Rise in Oats

    Stem rust of oats was found in one oats cultivar in the Crop Performance Test plots at the SDSU Southeast Research Farm in Beresford. The level of stem rust severity was moderate. Stem rust on oats is usually not a major problem partly due to good resistance in most oat cultivars. Although stem rust can also infect wheat, the type that infects wheat is different from the type that infects oats. So far, no stem rust has been found in surveyed wheat fields.

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    2015 SDSU Extension Millet Variety Trials

    Based on the latest USDA statistics, South Dakota produces nearly 16% of the nation’s proso millet – growing over 2 million bushels. This ranks South Dakota as the third largest proso millet producing state in the country. For South Dakota producers, its primary value is as a feed source for cattle. However, the grain can also be used in birdseed and human consumption. In 2015, we evaluated standard and experimental proso millet varieties for yield, agronomic characteristics and adaptation to Western South Dakota. This work was in collaboration with the University of Nebraska, which has one of the few active millet-breeding programs in the country.

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    Understanding Conservation Easements

    Conservation easements are a common, yet often misunderstood, real estate transaction tool. This article is intended to provide factual information regarding the rules and regulations that govern the use of conservation easements in South Dakota. Source citations include references to both direct sources and compilations that include additional references to law, case law, and easement publications.

    Read More »

    EPA Decision: Insecticide active ingredient “sulfoxaflor”

    The insecticide active ingredient sulfoxaflor is effective for managing insect pests with piercing sucking mouthparts including several species of aphids. In addition to being effective against major insect pests such as the soybean aphid, sulfoxaflor’s impact on natural enemies (e.g., damsel bugs, green lacewings, lady beetles, and minute pirate bugs) is reduced (Dow AgroSciences). This indicates that sulfoxaflor applications should not result in pest resurgences or replacements. That is, once an application is made the remaining natural enemy populations will provide effective management of any surviving insect pests, and secondary insect pest populations will not increase due to the absence of natural enemies.

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    NRCS Cropping Systems Inventory: Landowner & agency cooperation important for soil health

    South Dakota NRCS State Conservationist Jeff Zimprich announced on December 1st the release of the latest South Dakota Cropping Systems Inventory (formerly referred to as the “CTIC residue management survey”) at the joint annual meeting of Ag Horizons and the South Dakota Association of Conservation Districts. The data contained in this inventory is valuable to anyone participating in agriculture and natural resource conservation in South Dakota.

    Read More »

    2015 SDSU Field Pea Variety Trials Announcement

    The 2015 SDSU Field Peas Variety Trials are now available on iGrow! The 2015 Field Pea Variety Trials consisted of 5 sites (Bison, Blunt, Dakota Lakes, Selby and Wall) across the central and western portions of South Dakota. Weather played a significant role in this year’s growing season. Planting occurred in extremely dry conditions for most of the sites. Dry conditions led to delayed and uneven germination. As the spring progressed, conditions shifted to generally wet conditions.

    Read More »

    Weather Offers Extended Opportunity for Fall Weed Control

    Fall can be an excellent time to control many winter annuals like penny cress, shepherds purse, prickly lettuce, downy brome and marestail. Most years the window for applying herbicides in South Dakota is finished by early November. This year, however, climatologists are suggesting that we may not have a hard freeze in South Dakota for another couple of weeks. This weather will give winter annuals the opportunity to continue to germinate and grow.

    Read More »

    Latest First Fall Frost Dates

    As the warm fall season continues in October, gardens are still producing and fall planting and harvest activities are in full swing. A pattern of warmer than average weather is upon us. Most of the state still has not seen much frost, let alone a hard freeze, which begs the question, when is the latest first freeze we have seen in South Dakota?

    Read More »

    Glyphosate for Pre-Harvest Drydown

    Late season rains this year resulted in late germinating weeds.  Herbicide options were not available to control these weeds because of the growth stage of the crops. To avoid problems with green material during harvest and to reduce the risk of increased weed issues in the future, many producers may consider applying a pre-harvest desiccant to wheat and pea crops.

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    Disease Concerns in Field Peas

    The condition of South Dakota’s 2015 field pea crop is variable this year. Many fields look excellent, however some fields have developed bacterial blight on tissue damaged in recent storms. It is very common to see bacterial blight on peas early in their life. Often a late spring frost can damage plant tissue and result in bacterial blight. In most years in central South Dakota, the disease does not spread in the plant but remains in the lower tissue.

    Read More »

    Understanding Conservation Easements

    Conservation easements are a common, yet often misunderstood, real estate transaction tool. This article is intended to provide factual information regarding the rules and regulations that govern the use of conservation easements in South Dakota. Source citations include references to both direct sources and compilations that include additional references to law, case law, and easement publications.

    Read More »

    NRCS Cropping Systems Inventory: Landowner & agency cooperation important for soil health

    South Dakota NRCS State Conservationist Jeff Zimprich announced on December 1st the release of the latest South Dakota Cropping Systems Inventory (formerly referred to as the “CTIC residue management survey”) at the joint annual meeting of Ag Horizons and the South Dakota Association of Conservation Districts. The data contained in this inventory is valuable to anyone participating in agriculture and natural resource conservation in South Dakota.

    Read More »

    Weather Offers Extended Opportunity for Fall Weed Control

    Fall can be an excellent time to control many winter annuals like penny cress, shepherds purse, prickly lettuce, downy brome and marestail. Most years the window for applying herbicides in South Dakota is finished by early November. This year, however, climatologists are suggesting that we may not have a hard freeze in South Dakota for another couple of weeks. This weather will give winter annuals the opportunity to continue to germinate and grow.

    Read More »

    Latest First Fall Frost Dates

    As the warm fall season continues in October, gardens are still producing and fall planting and harvest activities are in full swing. A pattern of warmer than average weather is upon us. Most of the state still has not seen much frost, let alone a hard freeze, which begs the question, when is the latest first freeze we have seen in South Dakota?

    Read More »

    Prevention of Stored Grain Pests

    With harvest just around the corner it is time to start thinking about pre-harvest bin maintenance and ultimately preventing the new crop of stored grain from being infested by insects. Unfortunately, scouting and management decisions don’t stop once the crop is harvested, and actually continue until it is sold and delivered.

    Read More »

    Control Post-Emergent Weeds When Small

    When looking at preventing or managing glyphosate resistance, early control of post-emergence weeds is important. Roundup had the ability to control fairly large weeds so timing could be delayed to make sure all the weeds had emerged. When looking at help or control from conventional chemicals the rule of thumb is 2 – 4 inch weeds and it is best to err on the small side of that range. If they get too big the only control left is to cultivate or hand weed.

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    Cover Crops for a Dry Year

    An open, dry, winter, followed by a dry, warm spring has left the top soil in many areas of South Dakota much dryer than normal. Livestock producers may find themselves looking for supplemental feed this summer as a result of poor grass growth. In situations of moisture deficits most producers are not going to consider planting a cover crop.

    Read More »

    Understanding Conservation Easements

    Conservation easements are a common, yet often misunderstood, real estate transaction tool. This article is intended to provide factual information regarding the rules and regulations that govern the use of conservation easements in South Dakota. Source citations include references to both direct sources and compilations that include additional references to law, case law, and easement publications.

    Read More »

    NRCS Cropping Systems Inventory: Landowner & agency cooperation important for soil health

    South Dakota NRCS State Conservationist Jeff Zimprich announced on December 1st the release of the latest South Dakota Cropping Systems Inventory (formerly referred to as the “CTIC residue management survey”) at the joint annual meeting of Ag Horizons and the South Dakota Association of Conservation Districts. The data contained in this inventory is valuable to anyone participating in agriculture and natural resource conservation in South Dakota.

    Read More »

    Weather Offers Extended Opportunity for Fall Weed Control

    Fall can be an excellent time to control many winter annuals like penny cress, shepherds purse, prickly lettuce, downy brome and marestail. Most years the window for applying herbicides in South Dakota is finished by early November. This year, however, climatologists are suggesting that we may not have a hard freeze in South Dakota for another couple of weeks. This weather will give winter annuals the opportunity to continue to germinate and grow.

    Read More »

    Latest First Fall Frost Dates

    As the warm fall season continues in October, gardens are still producing and fall planting and harvest activities are in full swing. A pattern of warmer than average weather is upon us. Most of the state still has not seen much frost, let alone a hard freeze, which begs the question, when is the latest first freeze we have seen in South Dakota?

    Read More »

    Bumble Flower Beetles on Crops and Produce

    The bumble flower beetle attracts increased attention in the late summer and early fall. This is in part due to the presence of the adult beetles on crops, garden produce, and trees. The bumble flower beetle is medium-sized and makes a distinct buzzing sound during flight. These beetles can vary in color from yellow-brown to dark red-brown, with a pattern of dark spots that are very noticeable on their abdomens.

    Read More »

    Prevention of Stored Grain Pests

    With harvest just around the corner it is time to start thinking about pre-harvest bin maintenance and ultimately preventing the new crop of stored grain from being infested by insects. Unfortunately, scouting and management decisions don’t stop once the crop is harvested, and actually continue until it is sold and delivered.

    Read More »

    2015 South Dakota Sunflower Survey Training

    The National Sunflower Association coordinates a survey of sunflower fields in sunflower producing states across the US every second year. Volunteers from government agencies and private industry are enlisted to help with the survey. The survey collects information regarding insect, disease and weed issues and also estimates yield. Seed samples are collected from each field and sent to the USDA sunflower entomology program in Fargo to be analyzed for damage from sunflower moth, banded moth, lygus bug, and seed weevil larvae.

    Read More »

    Sunflower Rust and Phomopsis Stem Canker Appearing on Sunflower

    Sunflower rust (Puccinia helianthi) and Phomopsis stem canker (Diaporthe spp.) are showing up in SDSU sunflower research trials near Onida and Highmore. The sunflower plants are in the R4 – R5 development stage (prior to or during bloom). Current weather conditions are favorable for disease development and presence of inoculum. These diseases can work their way up the crop canopy and compromise yield.

    Read More »

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