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    SDSU Extension Hiring Towards Food Security

    It is estimated that by 2050 the planet will reach 9.1 billion people, 34 percent more than today. To be able to feed this population, food production must increase by 70 percent. Regardless of where this population growth happens we need to step up as a food-producing state and nation and contribute to reduce social unrests spurred by food shortages.

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    Alfalfa Production and Pest Management in South Dakota

    Long term alfalfa productivity depends on successful stand establishment. Achieving a profitable stand of alfalfa is the result of proper field selection utilizing proven production practices to ensure germination and establishment. Scouting fields for insects such as potato leafhopper and alfalfa weevil is also critical.

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    Findings on Survey: Alfalfa Variety Trials

    Something that has come to my attention as an SDSU Extension Forages Field Specialist is the need for additional research-based knowledge focused on how forages grow in the state. Upon doing some research, the most recent data we could find was from 2011, and even then, from a limited study which did not cover the diverse conditions which you, the producer, regularly encounter when trying to grow forages.

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    Managing Saline Soils in South Dakota: Part 1

    A soil has been described as a porous medium consisting of minerals, water, gases, organic matter, and microorganisms. The largest component of soil is the mineral portion, which makes up approximately 45% to 49% of the volume. Some of the mineral portion consists of primary mineral particles. These are the sand and silt particles.

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    Crop Variety Selection

    Farmers tend to be busy all year round. For crop growers, spring, summer and fall are times to get physically involved in the field whereas, winter is the time for in-depth planning and preparation for the subsequent three seasons. Taking time to plan on various aspects of crop production including variety selection will pay dividend at the end of the season.

    Read More »

    Feedstuff Inventory: Quality and Quantity

    Summer has brought cooler temperatures to our growing season, and with this in mind we need to start thinking about feedstuff inventory both in terms of quality and quantity. Hay inventories for the upcoming winter feeding could fall a bit short in some areas across the state, while other areas have an abundant quantity, but may not have the quality.

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    Corn Silage Harvest Moisture and Management

    Producers have started harvesting corn for silage, and here are some tips that could help to get the best out of this crop. Corn for silage should typically be harvested between 60-70% moisture. This moisture range is the most ideal for optimum fermentation and a rapid drop in pH to preserve the feed value of the crop.

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    SDSU Extension Hiring Towards Food Security

    It is estimated that by 2050 the planet will reach 9.1 billion people, 34 percent more than today. To be able to feed this population, food production must increase by 70 percent. Regardless of where this population growth happens we need to step up as a food-producing state and nation and contribute to reduce social unrests spurred by food shortages.

    Read More »

    Managing Saline Soils in South Dakota: Part 1

    A soil has been described as a porous medium consisting of minerals, water, gases, organic matter, and microorganisms. The largest component of soil is the mineral portion, which makes up approximately 45% to 49% of the volume. Some of the mineral portion consists of primary mineral particles. These are the sand and silt particles.

    Read More »

    Crop Variety Selection

    Farmers tend to be busy all year round. For crop growers, spring, summer and fall are times to get physically involved in the field whereas, winter is the time for in-depth planning and preparation for the subsequent three seasons. Taking time to plan on various aspects of crop production including variety selection will pay dividend at the end of the season.

    Read More »

    SDSU WEEDS Group at the Fair

    The SDSU WEED project will be at the fair to answer your questions again. This year the feature will be the amaranth “pigweed” species. There is a lot of confusion on what species we have in the state and how we can control them. This is your one stop location to get your questions answered by the experts.

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    Glyphosate Resistant Waterhemp: A Growing Problem

    Among the four glyphosate resistant weeds in South Dakota, common waterhemp has the potential to have the highest impact areas where a corn-soybean rotation is the mainstay. Thirty years ago waterhemp was only found in the very southeast corner of the state. It was a tough weed to control then and still is.

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    Early Winter Storm & Wet Fall: What it means for insect management next year

    While the aftermath of winter storm Atlas is still being felt by ranchers, growers of field and forage crops in storm hit areas of western South Dakota might see an unexpected positive outcome for the coming season. The timing of storm and the amount of precipitation might have a negative impact on field insect populations leading to low insect pressure on crops.

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    Interpreting Soil Test Micronutrient Values

    Soil analyses prior to planting can be an invaluable tool in determining nutrient application rates and diagnosing potential in-season deficiencies. Overwhelmingly, the focus of these tests is on the primary or macronutrients – Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P) and Potassium (K). Typical soil tests often report essential micronutrient contents, termed for their trace amounts found in plants and soil, and these numbers should not be overlooked.

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    Manage Weed Escapes And Prevent Next Year’s Weed Seed Bank

    A very important weed management strategy is to reduce the number of weed seeds present in the field and by limiting the potential weed populations during crop production season. This means watching for and managing weed escapes. If allowed to mature and go to seed these weeds will contribute to the next seasons weed seed bank. This is very important as it relates to herbicide resistant weeds.

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    SDSU Extension Hiring Towards Food Security

    It is estimated that by 2050 the planet will reach 9.1 billion people, 34 percent more than today. To be able to feed this population, food production must increase by 70 percent. Regardless of where this population growth happens we need to step up as a food-producing state and nation and contribute to reduce social unrests spurred by food shortages.

    Read More »

    Managing Saline Soils in South Dakota: Part 1

    A soil has been described as a porous medium consisting of minerals, water, gases, organic matter, and microorganisms. The largest component of soil is the mineral portion, which makes up approximately 45% to 49% of the volume. Some of the mineral portion consists of primary mineral particles. These are the sand and silt particles.

    Read More »

    Crop Variety Selection

    Farmers tend to be busy all year round. For crop growers, spring, summer and fall are times to get physically involved in the field whereas, winter is the time for in-depth planning and preparation for the subsequent three seasons. Taking time to plan on various aspects of crop production including variety selection will pay dividend at the end of the season.

    Read More »

    Protecting Pollinators from Insecticide Exposure

    Summer is in full swing! Soybeans are beginning to bloom, corn is tasseling, and sunflowers will start to show their flashy yellow flowers soon. Include the vast fields of alfalfa with the aforementioned crops and it’s clear that there are many acres of flowering crops in South Dakota that are extremely attractive to pollinators. I have been asked at nearly all Extension events organized by the SDSU Extension Service this summer about the impact of insecticides on pollinators.

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    Cover Crop Considerations in 2014

    Moisture conditions across the state may have people considering growing cover crops this year. Wheat harvest is just around the corner and many wheat producers in central South Dakota have found that cover crops planted after wheat can provide some benefits. This year with the positive moisture situation across many areas of the state, cover crops after wheat harvest will be an excellent fit.

    Read More »

    SDSU Extension Hiring Towards Food Security

    It is estimated that by 2050 the planet will reach 9.1 billion people, 34 percent more than today. To be able to feed this population, food production must increase by 70 percent. Regardless of where this population growth happens we need to step up as a food-producing state and nation and contribute to reduce social unrests spurred by food shortages.

    Read More »

    Managing Saline Soils in South Dakota: Part 1

    A soil has been described as a porous medium consisting of minerals, water, gases, organic matter, and microorganisms. The largest component of soil is the mineral portion, which makes up approximately 45% to 49% of the volume. Some of the mineral portion consists of primary mineral particles. These are the sand and silt particles.

    Read More »

    Crop Variety Selection

    Farmers tend to be busy all year round. For crop growers, spring, summer and fall are times to get physically involved in the field whereas, winter is the time for in-depth planning and preparation for the subsequent three seasons. Taking time to plan on various aspects of crop production including variety selection will pay dividend at the end of the season.

    Read More »

    Checking Weed Control at Harvest

    With Harvest now in full swing don’t forget to look at your fall weed control. What are the weeds that are left in your crop? Do you know which weeds they are? Is there a weed that you do not know and how large is it? Does it look like the weed was not controlled at spraying time? Did you have an herbicide failure or is it a weed that your product does not control?

    Read More »

    Palmer Amaranth Found in South Dakota

    SDSU weed science team confirms the finding of Palmer Amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) in South Dakota. The Palmer Amaranth plants were found in a sunflower field in Buffalo County next to the Missouri River in central South Dakota. Palmer Amaranth is a vigorous weed that is a member of the pigweed family that also includes common waterhemp, redroot pigweed, prostrate pigweed and others.

    Read More »

    Pre-harvest Weed Control in Row Crops

    Interesting weather throughout the spray season has left some fields with more weed problems than normal. There is still an opportunity to keep some of these weeds from having viable seed and also help with killing the weeds to make harvest easier. 2,4-D, a growth regulator herbicide, can be sprayed on corn after the brown silk stage on most labels.

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    Why Grow Sorghum (Milo)?

    With advances in corn genetics to tolerate dry conditions, and the adoption of glyphosate resistant corn, many farmers may ask, “why should I grow grain sorghum?” Grain sorghum, or milo, has long been known as a drought tolerant crop. Sorghum shares the water use efficiency of other warm-season grass crops. While sorghum requires about 6.5” of moisture to get to the point where it will produce grain, the production with additional moisture is very efficient; accumulating about 500 lbs of grain or about 9 bushels per acre-inch once that point is reached.

    Read More »

    SDSU Extension Hiring Towards Food Security

    It is estimated that by 2050 the planet will reach 9.1 billion people, 34 percent more than today. To be able to feed this population, food production must increase by 70 percent. Regardless of where this population growth happens we need to step up as a food-producing state and nation and contribute to reduce social unrests spurred by food shortages.

    Read More »

    Managing Saline Soils in South Dakota: Part 1

    A soil has been described as a porous medium consisting of minerals, water, gases, organic matter, and microorganisms. The largest component of soil is the mineral portion, which makes up approximately 45% to 49% of the volume. Some of the mineral portion consists of primary mineral particles. These are the sand and silt particles.

    Read More »

    Crop Variety Selection

    Farmers tend to be busy all year round. For crop growers, spring, summer and fall are times to get physically involved in the field whereas, winter is the time for in-depth planning and preparation for the subsequent three seasons. Taking time to plan on various aspects of crop production including variety selection will pay dividend at the end of the season.

    Read More »

    Using Variety Trial Results to Select Crop Varieties

    The success of crop production is affected by choice of variety. Variety trial results from universities or other sources provide useful information that can allow producers to make informed decisions on which varieties to select. Variety characteristics such as seed yield, herbicide or pest resistance, stem strength, maturity, and quality traits such as oil or protein content should be examined carefully when deciding which variety or varieties to plant.

    Read More »

    Checking Weed Control at Harvest

    With Harvest now in full swing don’t forget to look at your fall weed control. What are the weeds that are left in your crop? Do you know which weeds they are? Is there a weed that you do not know and how large is it? Does it look like the weed was not controlled at spraying time? Did you have an herbicide failure or is it a weed that your product does not control?

    Read More »

    Palmer Amaranth Found in South Dakota

    SDSU weed science team confirms the finding of Palmer Amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) in South Dakota. The Palmer Amaranth plants were found in a sunflower field in Buffalo County next to the Missouri River in central South Dakota. Palmer Amaranth is a vigorous weed that is a member of the pigweed family that also includes common waterhemp, redroot pigweed, prostrate pigweed and others.

    Read More »

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