Wheat

Resource Library

  • Publications
  • Articles
  • Videos
  • News
  • Events

    Central South Dakota: 2016 Potential Crop Profitability

    An analysis of the potential profitability of crops for 2016 for Central South Dakota was performed. This study examined returns given modified South Dakota State University Extension crop budgets for central & west production areas that include estimates for both direct and fixed costs. This analysis also incorporates risk associated with yields, crop prices, and fertilizer prices. Distributions for the risk variables were developed to include in the model.

    Read More »

    Changes in Argentinian Government to Affect U.S. Wheat Prices

    Today’s agriculture operates in a globalized world where something that happens in one region or country affects another. Communications have acted as a catalyst for this globalization; what took days or even weeks to be known in the past, take seconds today. There is a commitment by the World Trade Organization (WTO) to remove all “barriers” to international trade and lead to “free trade” among countries. There will be Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats for every country, the SWOT analysis performed on any project or endeavor.

    Read More »

    Farmers and Ranchers Needed for Survey

    We are devoted to meeting the needs of farmers and rancher across the state. To achieve this goal, SDSU Extension is interested in learning more about your current mood and level of social support. If you are 18 years of age or older and farming or ranching is your occupation, please consider completing a 5-10 minute survey that would help us acquire information to design and implement future programs to serve farm and ranch families. To express our gratitude for your valuable time, you will be mailed a $10 Mastercard gift card that can be used anywhere.

    Read More »

    Towards a Circular Agricultural Economy

    In 2015 the USDA analyzed the unprecedented agricultural growth that has been operating in South Dakota during this century. It led the agency to label the state as a future “agriculture powerhouse”. While between 1997 and 2002 agricultural sales grew by only 4.7 percent, they jumped to 71 percent between 02’ and 07’, followed by an additional 55 percent between 07’ and 2012. It is likely the growth during the last five-year cycle was slowed down as a result of the 2012 drought.

    Read More »

    South Dakota Becoming an Agriculture Powerhouse

    In a May 7 article titled “South Dakota Becoming an Agriculture Powerhouse” the USDA analyzed the unprecedented agricultural growth that has been operating in the state during the last decade. In 2012, the year for which the latest Census was conducted, farmers and ranchers in the state sold more than $10 billion worth of agricultural products.

    Read More »

    Precision Agriculture: Food Security Without Overburdening the Environment

    It is estimated that by 2050 the US will have a population of 402 million, 25.2% greater than today (U.N. 2015). In order to feed this population and sustain the country’s economy through commodities exports, agricultural output needs to increase by a similar amount by that year. These figures are projections based on current population and food production dynamics. Significant changes in any of these two parameters can accelerate or slowdown these trends.

    Read More »

    Producer Feedback Sought on Wheat Varieties

    The South Dakota Wheat Commission is currently seeking information and feedback from farmers on wheat variety preferences and current production practices. Surveys have been mailed to producers across South Dakota (SD) with the goal of collecting information that can be used to guide researchers and breeders, so their work can better meet the needs of South Dakota producers and consumers.

    Read More »

    Income, Computers and Internet Use in SD Farms

    Computer access, ownership, or lease increased in South Dakota farms by almost 9% between 2011 and 2013. This is very significant since between 2009 and 2011 there had been no changes. Computer use in state farms is currently nearly 6% greater than the average for the country.

    Read More »

    Farms and Land in Farms: Defining our audience.

    South Dakota is clearly an agricultural state, farm size triples that of the rest of the US with one farm every 25 people compared to one every 154 for the nation. In 2014 the state had 31,700 farms in 43.3 million acres farmed with an average farm size of 1,353 acres.

    Read More »

    Crop Variety Selection

    Farmers tend to be busy all year round. For crop growers, spring, summer and fall are times to get physically involved in the field whereas, winter is the time for in-depth planning and preparation for the subsequent three seasons. Taking time to plan on various aspects of crop production including variety selection will pay dividend at the end of the season.

    Read More »

    Is Snow Bad for Crops?

    Corn and soybeans, two major South Dakota (SD) crops are warm season species that depending on their growth stage, can suffer significant detrimental effects from untimely snow and cold temperatures. However, another major SD crop wheat, can markedly benefit from the snow falling through the winter. Winter wheat seeded in the fall germinates, grows roots, and gets well established before going dormant during the hard winters of the Northern Plains. If exposed consistently to sub-zero temperatures plant tissues can be damaged even permanently.

    Read More »

    Immobilizing Nitrogen through the Use of Cover Crops

    It has been well-documented that annual precipitation across parts of South Dakota and the Midwest has increased over time. It does not come as a complete surprise then that we have seen an increase in the installation of subsurface tile drainage systems in eastern South Dakota. Tile drainage can reduce sediment erosion and particulate-bound phosphorus losses on agricultural land with poor natural drainage. Studies have also shown, however; that tile drainage may increase exports of soluble nutrients to surface waters such as nitrate-nitrogen and dissolved phosphorus.

    Read More »

    NRCS Cropping Systems Inventory: Landowner & agency cooperation important for soil health

    South Dakota NRCS State Conservationist Jeff Zimprich announced on December 1st the release of the latest South Dakota Cropping Systems Inventory (formerly referred to as the “CTIC residue management survey”) at the joint annual meeting of Ag Horizons and the South Dakota Association of Conservation Districts. The data contained in this inventory is valuable to anyone participating in agriculture and natural resource conservation in South Dakota.

    Read More »

    Should Fungicides be Applied to Winter Wheat in The Fall?

    There have been a few reports of stripe rust developing on winter whea this fall in central and western regions of South Dakota. Fungal leaf spots, such as tanspot, have also been reported. The mild fall weather we are currently experiencing have led to these diseases to develop and producers are asking if it is worth applying a fungicide to winter wheat this fall?

    Read More »

    Weather Offers Extended Opportunity for Fall Weed Control

    Fall can be an excellent time to control many winter annuals like penny cress, shepherds purse, prickly lettuce, downy brome and marestail. Most years the window for applying herbicides in South Dakota is finished by early November. This year, however, climatologists are suggesting that we may not have a hard freeze in South Dakota for another couple of weeks. This weather will give winter annuals the opportunity to continue to germinate and grow.

    Read More »

    Latest First Fall Frost Dates

    As the warm fall season continues in October, gardens are still producing and fall planting and harvest activities are in full swing. A pattern of warmer than average weather is upon us. Most of the state still has not seen much frost, let alone a hard freeze, which begs the question, when is the latest first freeze we have seen in South Dakota?

    Read More »

    Summertime Climate After an El Niño Winter

    El Niño is here to stay… at least through the winter season. It is one of the primary drivers of our climate that affects us on a multi-year scale in North America. In South Dakota, very strong El Niño conditions, like we have this year, usually mean warmer than average conditions in the winter season. But what happens in the growing season following an El Niño winter?

    Read More »

    2015 Frost/Freeze Outlook

    Questions about frost/freeze potential are common this time of the year as producers look for a little more time for crops to mature, or gardeners and horticulture enthusiasts hope for some extra days to collect a few more tomatoes. Projecting specific frost dates are difficult beyond using models out to 1-2 weeks. Thus, climatologies and current crop progress become very important.

    Read More »

    Grains of Truth: What is Folic Acid?

    January is National Birth Defects Prevention Month. Folic acid, a form of folate, has become a household word in recent years. Folic acid is a B vitamin that is used to fortify foods and has been shown to protect against neural tube defects such as spina bifida (a birth defect in which the spinal cord is not completely encased in bone) and anencephaly (a fatal defect in which part of the brain never develops). It may also prevent against oral and facial birth defects such as cleft palate.

    Read More »

    Farm Equipment, Safety on the Road, Everyone’s Role

    Even though fall harvest is a ways off, we still encounter farm equipment on the road, whether it is a tractor and baler, someone hauling feed between farms, or the impending corn silage harvest in about four to five weeks. The point is we all need to be vigilant as a producer or a motorist encountering farm equipment on the road.

    Read More »

    South Dakota Becoming an Agriculture Powerhouse

    In a May 7 article titled “South Dakota Becoming an Agriculture Powerhouse” the USDA analyzed the unprecedented agricultural growth that has been operating in the state during the last decade. In 2012, the year for which the latest Census was conducted, farmers and ranchers in the state sold more than $10 billion worth of agricultural products.

    Read More »

    Bees, Pollination and Agricultural Production

    The USDA recently reported the preliminary results of the Bee Informed National Management Survey. Overall, the total reported annual honey bee hive loss for 2014-2015 was 42 percent, which is greater than the losses reported in 2013-2014. This report is also the first time that summer hive losses were greater than winter hive losses (27 and 23 percent, respectively). However, the winter losses were less than those in 2013-2014 and they are below the 9-year winter loss average of 28.7 percent.

    Read More »

    Producer Feedback Sought on Wheat Varieties

    The South Dakota Wheat Commission is currently seeking information and feedback from farmers on wheat variety preferences and current production practices. Surveys have been mailed to producers across South Dakota (SD) with the goal of collecting information that can be used to guide researchers and breeders, so their work can better meet the needs of South Dakota producers and consumers.

    Read More »

    EPA Decision: Insecticide active ingredient “sulfoxaflor”

    The insecticide active ingredient sulfoxaflor is effective for managing insect pests with piercing sucking mouthparts including several species of aphids. In addition to being effective against major insect pests such as the soybean aphid, sulfoxaflor’s impact on natural enemies (e.g., damsel bugs, green lacewings, lady beetles, and minute pirate bugs) is reduced (Dow AgroSciences). This indicates that sulfoxaflor applications should not result in pest resurgences or replacements. That is, once an application is made the remaining natural enemy populations will provide effective management of any surviving insect pests, and secondary insect pest populations will not increase due to the absence of natural enemies.

    Read More »

    Should Fungicides be Applied to Winter Wheat in The Fall?

    There have been a few reports of stripe rust developing on winter whea this fall in central and western regions of South Dakota. Fungal leaf spots, such as tanspot, have also been reported. The mild fall weather we are currently experiencing have led to these diseases to develop and producers are asking if it is worth applying a fungicide to winter wheat this fall?

    Read More »

    Weather Offers Extended Opportunity for Fall Weed Control

    Fall can be an excellent time to control many winter annuals like penny cress, shepherds purse, prickly lettuce, downy brome and marestail. Most years the window for applying herbicides in South Dakota is finished by early November. This year, however, climatologists are suggesting that we may not have a hard freeze in South Dakota for another couple of weeks. This weather will give winter annuals the opportunity to continue to germinate and grow.

    Read More »

    Grasshoppers and Winter Wheat

    Reports are coming in of large grasshopper populations throughout South Dakota this summer and early fall. While these populations will continue to decline, there is still the possibility for significant populations to remain until after the first hard frost. In areas where grasshopper populations have been consistently high, it is important to scout emerging winter wheat for injury, and manage grasshopper populations when necessary. The limited amount of green vegetation in the fall makes the newly emerging winter wheat very attractive to grasshoppers.

    Read More »

    Scouting Winter Wheat for Aphid and Mite Pests

    Winter wheat has started emerging in some locations, which means that scouting efforts for aphid and mite pests need to begin. The aphids that should be scouted for include the bird cherry oat aphid, English grain aphid, greenbug, and Russian wheat aphid. These aphids have the capacity to reduce yield through direct feeding, and the bird cherry oat aphid, English grain aphid, and greenbug are also vectors of Barley yellow dwarf virus.

    Read More »

    Target Noxious Weeds This Fall

    If they have not been treated yet, now is the time to spray those perennial weeds we battle every year. Fall is an excellent time to treat Canada thistle, leafy spurge, and other noxious weeds around the farm and home. Fall control of annual weeds like crabgrass, foxtail, knotweed or purslane is unnecessary and wasteful. These weeds only live for one summer, and naturally die in fall so control is unnecessary. Before applying any herbicide, know what weeds you are trying to control. Your county Weed and Pest Supervisor or the SDSU Extension Weed Program can help with identification.

    Read More »

    Prevention of Stored Grain Pests

    With harvest just around the corner it is time to start thinking about pre-harvest bin maintenance and ultimately preventing the new crop of stored grain from being infested by insects. Unfortunately, scouting and management decisions don’t stop once the crop is harvested, and actually continue until it is sold and delivered.

    Read More »

    Immobilizing Nitrogen through the Use of Cover Crops

    It has been well-documented that annual precipitation across parts of South Dakota and the Midwest has increased over time. It does not come as a complete surprise then that we have seen an increase in the installation of subsurface tile drainage systems in eastern South Dakota. Tile drainage can reduce sediment erosion and particulate-bound phosphorus losses on agricultural land with poor natural drainage. Studies have also shown, however; that tile drainage may increase exports of soluble nutrients to surface waters such as nitrate-nitrogen and dissolved phosphorus.

    Read More »

    NRCS Cropping Systems Inventory: Landowner & agency cooperation important for soil health

    South Dakota NRCS State Conservationist Jeff Zimprich announced on December 1st the release of the latest South Dakota Cropping Systems Inventory (formerly referred to as the “CTIC residue management survey”) at the joint annual meeting of Ag Horizons and the South Dakota Association of Conservation Districts. The data contained in this inventory is valuable to anyone participating in agriculture and natural resource conservation in South Dakota.

    Read More »

    From the Top Down

    Recently, I attended the 1st in a series of 5 tours called the I-29 Soil Health and Cover Crop Field Tours. It was a chain of tours along the I-29 corridor during the month of September that began near Sioux Falls and ended near Raymond, South Dakota. The main purpose of the tours was to assess cover crops for beneficial soil health properties and forage/feed value for grazing livestock. Several long-term no-till operations however were also evaluated with regards to soil structure and its effect on water quality and quantity on the landscape.

    Read More »

    Summertime Climate After an El Niño Winter

    El Niño is here to stay… at least through the winter season. It is one of the primary drivers of our climate that affects us on a multi-year scale in North America. In South Dakota, very strong El Niño conditions, like we have this year, usually mean warmer than average conditions in the winter season. But what happens in the growing season following an El Niño winter?

    Read More »

    I-29 Soil Health and Cover Crop Field Tours

    SDSU Extension in cooperation with the SD No-Till Association, South Dakota Soybean Research and Promotion Council, Millborn Seeds, Mustang/Coyote Seeds, USDA-NRCS, USDA-ARS, Southeast Research Farm, Northeast Research Farm and the newly formed SD Soil Health Coalition will be offering five soil health and cover crop tours in eastern South Dakota during September.

    Read More »

    Cover Crops: Species Selection

    Interest in cover crops in South Dakota is increasing. Farmers are growing cover crops as a monoculture or blend/s to improve soil quality and supplement forage needs. The frequently grown cover crops species in this region could belong to a broad group of plants such as warm or cool season grass, cool season broadleaf, brassica species, or legumes. One advantage of growing a blend over monoculture is it helps partition available resources to different plant species at different times rather than all plants requiring the same resource at the same time.

    Read More »

    Short-term Flooding: Impacts on soil properties

    Recent heavy rains have created small scale stagnant flooded soil. Nitrate-N leaching and denitrification are primary concerns for crop producers. However, other soil conditions are also affected. The rapid depletion of soil oxygen causes a shift in nitrogen cycle soil micro-organisms that lead to the denitrification processes.

    Read More »

    SDSU Dakota Lakes Research Farm Soil Health Field Day: Lessons learned

    A soil health field day was held at the research farm near Pierre on July 14, 2015 hosted by the newly formed SD Soil Health Coalition, SD Grassland Coalition, SARE, SDSU Extension and Ag. Experiment Station, USDA-NRCS, SD No-Till Association and the SDSU Dakota Lakes Research Farm. Speakers at the field day focused on the importance of soil health and factors which can lead to improving and maintaining it.

    Read More »

    Report from the First West River Field School

    The West River Field School on June 30th in Rapid City was the first time such an event was held in the western part of the state. It was a one-day event attended by 41 participants with five sessions covered by speakers from SDSU and NRCS. The event was sponsored by The Wheat Commission of South Dakota and Farm Credit Services of America.

    Read More »

    Intensive Precipitation Patterns Reveal Poor Soil Health

    Erosion (sheet, rill or gully) and soil surface sealing are visual examples that indicate poor soil health. The occurrence of these events are a result of soil with poor structure, low organic matter (carbon), un-protected soil surface, possibly little or no earthworm activity, and tillage.

    Read More »

    Sign Up For Email!

    • Field Staff Listing
    • South Dakota 4HOnline