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    Equitarian Initiative 2016 Costa Rica Workshop: Perspectives of an SDSU student

    On January 22, 2016, Dr. Becky Bott and two undergraduate students, Jordan Nichols and Brittney Schlaikjer, traveled to Costa Rica to do just that. These SDSU delegates, along with many other students, veterinarians and veterinary techs, joined the Equitarian Initiative 2016 Workshop in Costa Rica and spent 9 days working in the blistering Costa Rican heat treating the working equids of the country.

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    Where Do the Sharps Go?

    I gave my animal a shot, now what? Animals receive shots for various reasons throughout their life, just like people. Sometimes they are used to prevent diseases, in the case of vaccinations; and sometimes they are used to help an animal recover from a bacterial illness, as with antibiotics. Regardless of why the animal received a shot, it is important to dispose of the needle in a safe way.

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    Anticoagulant Use and Hemorrhage in Horses

    Anticoagulant rodenticides such as brodifacoum, diphacinone, bromadiolone, and chlorophacinone are used as pest control at various horse racing facilities. Targeted animals that ingest anticoagulant rodenticides generally develop hemorrhagic diathesis, which in most cases can result in death. The main effect of anticoagulant rodenticides on the body is the inhibition of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors.

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    Animal Well-being in South Dakota: Survey closes June 30th

    The SDSU Extension team is conducting a survey to investigate questions about the current level of care being offered to animals and the perceptions people have about animal well-being in South Dakota. The goal of the survey is to gain understanding about the current perceptions of animal well-being in South Dakota, with an emphasis on horses. As the study continues, additional information on other livestock species may be collected.

    Read More »

    We Need Your Help: Investigating Animal Well-being in South Dakota

    What is the current level of care being offered to animals in South Dakota? What perceptions about animal well-being exist in South Dakota? What educational resources are you looking for to learn more about animal well-being and on-farm care? Are you curious to know the answers? So are we.

    Read More »

    Heat Exhaustion & Stroke: Protecting yourself and your employees

    For those whose livelihood depends upon working outdoors or in less than favorable conditions, the coming weeks look to be quite difficult with higher than normal temperatures and humidity predicted. For example, cows still need to be milked and fed, barns are not air conditioned, even though there is emphasis on cow comfort through ventilation and cooling, we sometimes get lax on also protecting ourselves and employees from the effects of heat.

    Read More »

    Preventing an Unwanted Baler Fire

    Dry conditions this year have reminded many how quickly fires can ignite causing damage, destroying equipment, future feedstuffs and hopefully NOT injuring you in the process. We need to be cognizant at all times of the potential for fires to start while baling hay or straw and take measures to minimize the potential of a fire occurring.

    Read More »

    SDDA Sensitive Site Registry: Protecting sensitive areas from chemical drift

    The SD Dept. of Ag. recently announced updates to the Sensitive Site Registry. First launched in 2013, the Sensitive Site Registry is designed for producers and applicators (private and commercial) to better understand where chemical and fertilizer drift and misapplications are to be avoided. This registry has the potential to be an excellent tool in fostering positive communications between those who apply chemicals and those who are concerned with drift, and SDDA specifically created the registry to provide information about farms and ranches that would be adversely affected by accidental fertilizer or pesticide application or drift.

    Read More »

    SDSU Survey on Land Use Decisions Highlights Role of Grasslands

    The issue of land use and grassland conversion to croplands remains a central topic in the agriculture and natural resources arenas. Generally speaking, grassland conversion is described in two primary ways, the first being conversion…or re-conversion…of ‘tame’ grasslands such as Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) acres and old tame grass hayfields and pastures to row-crop agriculture.

    Read More »

    New Grassland CRP Offers Grazing Options

    In September 2015, the USDA launched a new Conservation Reserve Program option called ‘CRP grasslands’. While not perfect, this new program took a major step toward improved management and utilization of expiring CRP and GRP acres under a ‘working lands’ philosophy while retaining the inherent value of the grass cover for wildlife, water, and recreation. This new program was brought about largely by feedback provided by CRP landowners and conservation groups alike.

    Read More »

    Minimizing Hay Storage Loss from Heating or Fires

    Successful hay storage is essential to provide high quality feedstuffs to ensure desired performance from livestock forages while deterring economic loss from unwanted hay storage fires. The predominant reason that heating or fires occurs in hay is because of excessive moisture in the plant residue when it is baled or stacked for long term storage.

    Read More »

    Updated SD Drought Tool: Drought planning made easier

    Drought is an ever-present threat to grazing operations throughout South Dakota and always seems like it is ‘just around the corner.’ There are several excellent resources for monitoring drought status for rangelands. The South Dakota Drought tool is an extremely user-friendly drought and pasture planning resource designed specifically for monitoring the current and near future drought status of grasslands.

    Read More »

    Equitarian Initiative 2016 Costa Rica Workshop: Perspectives of an SDSU student

    On January 22, 2016, Dr. Becky Bott and two undergraduate students, Jordan Nichols and Brittney Schlaikjer, traveled to Costa Rica to do just that. These SDSU delegates, along with many other students, veterinarians and veterinary techs, joined the Equitarian Initiative 2016 Workshop in Costa Rica and spent 9 days working in the blistering Costa Rican heat treating the working equids of the country.

    Read More »

    Proper Sampling of Hay and Forages

    You have heard it said many times before, “the results are only as good as the sample that was taken”. This is a reality for all feedstuffs especially where forage sampling is concerned. Let’s first start with “why” we want accurate results. As dairymen and livestock caretakers we are trying to optimize the performance of our livestock, whether it is producing milk or meat.

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    State 4-H Horse Show: Advance access to show patterns creates positive experiences

    The South Dakota State 4-H Horse show is an opportunity for youth to demonstrate new and improved horsemanship skills. Despite the fact that the event is designed to be youth-oriented and that it involves horses, horse shows can, at times, provide a source of stress for contestants. One possible cause for stress is that youth need to learn horse show patterns; historically, these patterns were often posted within hours of the start of the show.

    Read More »

    Equitarian Initiative 2016 Costa Rica Workshop: Perspectives of an SDSU student

    On January 22, 2016, Dr. Becky Bott and two undergraduate students, Jordan Nichols and Brittney Schlaikjer, traveled to Costa Rica to do just that. These SDSU delegates, along with many other students, veterinarians and veterinary techs, joined the Equitarian Initiative 2016 Workshop in Costa Rica and spent 9 days working in the blistering Costa Rican heat treating the working equids of the country.

    Read More »

    Animal Well-being in South Dakota: Survey closes June 30th

    The SDSU Extension team is conducting a survey to investigate questions about the current level of care being offered to animals and the perceptions people have about animal well-being in South Dakota. The goal of the survey is to gain understanding about the current perceptions of animal well-being in South Dakota, with an emphasis on horses. As the study continues, additional information on other livestock species may be collected.

    Read More »

    We Need Your Help: Investigating Animal Well-being in South Dakota

    What is the current level of care being offered to animals in South Dakota? What perceptions about animal well-being exist in South Dakota? What educational resources are you looking for to learn more about animal well-being and on-farm care? Are you curious to know the answers? So are we.

    Read More »

    Heat Exhaustion & Stroke: Protecting yourself and your employees

    For those whose livelihood depends upon working outdoors or in less than favorable conditions, the coming weeks look to be quite difficult with higher than normal temperatures and humidity predicted. For example, cows still need to be milked and fed, barns are not air conditioned, even though there is emphasis on cow comfort through ventilation and cooling, we sometimes get lax on also protecting ourselves and employees from the effects of heat.

    Read More »

    Preventing an Unwanted Baler Fire

    Dry conditions this year have reminded many how quickly fires can ignite causing damage, destroying equipment, future feedstuffs and hopefully NOT injuring you in the process. We need to be cognizant at all times of the potential for fires to start while baling hay or straw and take measures to minimize the potential of a fire occurring.

    Read More »

    SDDA Sensitive Site Registry: Protecting sensitive areas from chemical drift

    The SD Dept. of Ag. recently announced updates to the Sensitive Site Registry. First launched in 2013, the Sensitive Site Registry is designed for producers and applicators (private and commercial) to better understand where chemical and fertilizer drift and misapplications are to be avoided. This registry has the potential to be an excellent tool in fostering positive communications between those who apply chemicals and those who are concerned with drift, and SDDA specifically created the registry to provide information about farms and ranches that would be adversely affected by accidental fertilizer or pesticide application or drift.

    Read More »

    SDSU Survey on Land Use Decisions Highlights Role of Grasslands

    The issue of land use and grassland conversion to croplands remains a central topic in the agriculture and natural resources arenas. Generally speaking, grassland conversion is described in two primary ways, the first being conversion…or re-conversion…of ‘tame’ grasslands such as Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) acres and old tame grass hayfields and pastures to row-crop agriculture.

    Read More »

    New Grassland CRP Offers Grazing Options

    In September 2015, the USDA launched a new Conservation Reserve Program option called ‘CRP grasslands’. While not perfect, this new program took a major step toward improved management and utilization of expiring CRP and GRP acres under a ‘working lands’ philosophy while retaining the inherent value of the grass cover for wildlife, water, and recreation. This new program was brought about largely by feedback provided by CRP landowners and conservation groups alike.

    Read More »

    Planning CRP and Grassland Mixes for Future Grazing

    The history of federal involvement in soil preservation dates back to dust bowl era of the 1930’s with the 1933 Agricultural Adjustment Act. This was the first in a long series of ‘Farm Bills’ that continue to guide our soil and water conservation strategies today. Currently, one of the most popular soil conservation programs is the Conservation Reserve Program, or CRP as it is commonly known. CRP is cooperatively administered under the US Department of Agriculture’s Farm Services Agency (FSA) and Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS).

    Read More »

    Minimizing Hay Storage Loss from Heating or Fires

    Successful hay storage is essential to provide high quality feedstuffs to ensure desired performance from livestock forages while deterring economic loss from unwanted hay storage fires. The predominant reason that heating or fires occurs in hay is because of excessive moisture in the plant residue when it is baled or stacked for long term storage.

    Read More »

    Updated SD Drought Tool: Drought planning made easier

    Drought is an ever-present threat to grazing operations throughout South Dakota and always seems like it is ‘just around the corner.’ There are several excellent resources for monitoring drought status for rangelands. The South Dakota Drought tool is an extremely user-friendly drought and pasture planning resource designed specifically for monitoring the current and near future drought status of grasslands.

    Read More »

    Extending a Gait

    In many horse show patterns, the judge will challenge the competitors by asking for an extension of a walk, trot, or canter. Extending a gait involves engaging the hind end of the horse so they can lengthen their stride while still being supple through their body. This should not cause the rhythm or speed of the gait to change in any way. Extension is the lengthening of a stride, not the quickening of the stride.

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    Turning on the Forehand

    A turn on the forehand is an advanced maneuver for horses and riders. A definition provided by George Morris says, “This exercise means that the horse’s haunches move in a circular track around the forehand, which remains close to stationary and acts almost as a pivot." Turning on the forehand is similar to a turn on the haunches, but the front hoof on the side you are turning towards becomes the pivot point.

    Read More »

    State 4-H Horse Show: Advance access to show patterns creates positive experiences

    The South Dakota State 4-H Horse show is an opportunity for youth to demonstrate new and improved horsemanship skills. Despite the fact that the event is designed to be youth-oriented and that it involves horses, horse shows can, at times, provide a source of stress for contestants. One possible cause for stress is that youth need to learn horse show patterns; historically, these patterns were often posted within hours of the start of the show.

    Read More »

    An Aid for Preparing Livestock Judging Oral Reasons

    Giving reasons is one of the most useful things you will have the opportunity to do while judging livestock. Preparing and giving reasons helps develop memory and public speaking skills, all while participating in an industry based activity. However, regardless of if you are just starting or at the college level, they can be a tough task to complete and be successful at. This article will give you a better understanding of how to accomplish the experience and score you wish to achieve. 

    Read More »

    Animal Well-being in South Dakota: Survey closes June 30th

    The SDSU Extension team is conducting a survey to investigate questions about the current level of care being offered to animals and the perceptions people have about animal well-being in South Dakota. The goal of the survey is to gain understanding about the current perceptions of animal well-being in South Dakota, with an emphasis on horses. As the study continues, additional information on other livestock species may be collected.

    Read More »

    We Need Your Help: Investigating Animal Well-being in South Dakota

    What is the current level of care being offered to animals in South Dakota? What perceptions about animal well-being exist in South Dakota? What educational resources are you looking for to learn more about animal well-being and on-farm care? Are you curious to know the answers? So are we.

    Read More »

    Equine Seminar: Growing Through Knowledge

    An equine seminar was hosted on the campus of South Dakota State University August 16. The seminar, hosted by Extension Equine Specialist, Dr. Becky Bott, was comprised of eight seminars given by experts from around the U.S. The topics of rotational grazing and nutritional benefits of pastures were discussed by Laura Kenny and Dr. Carey Williams of Rutgers, New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.

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    Livestock Husbandry & Handling Workshop: Dr. Temple Grandin in Watertown, SD

    South Dakota is a strong agricultural state with large numbers of livestock being raised by farmers and ranchers. On August 5, 2014, Dr. Temple Grandin will be back in South Dakota for the second Raising the Best: Livestock Husbandry and Handling for Today’s Market workshop this summer held in Watertown, SD. This workshop is hosted by South Dakota Farmers Union in partnership with SDSU Extension. The workshop is made possible by a grant through the USDA.

    Read More »

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