Pork Article Archive

Drought

As South Dakota's farmers, ranchers and communities deal with the challenges brought on by drought conditions impacting more than half the state, SDSU Extension is connecting individuals with resources and research-based information.

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Feeding DON-Contaminated Wheat to Pigs

Based on a recent report by Dr. Emmanuel Byamukama, Differentiating Between Wheat Head Diseases and Disorders, it appears that conditions are right for Fusarium head blight (or scab) growth in South Dakota, which leads to the production of the mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol (DON) in wheat. While DON-contaminated grains can cause problems for livestock, pork producers have several options when dealing with this situation.

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June 2016 Hogs & Pigs Report Indicates S.D. Sow Numbers in Top 10 in the United States

Sow numbers in S.D. are at 190,000 sows, which puts S.D. in the top 10 in sow numbers in the United States. Also, S.D. ranks #11 in market hogs. As new sow units and finishing barns get approved and built, these numbers will increase in the future. Not only will these new barns provide needed jobs to rural communities and an avenue for young people to return to the family farm, they will also create an increased demand for locally raised corn and soybeans.

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Eating Like a Pig is Healthy

On Thursday, February 25, 2016, Dr. Eric Berg gave a presentation at South Dakota State University on “Eating Like a Pig: The Role of Meat in the Human Diet” as part of the University’s Speakers series. Berg, a Professor of Meat Science from North Dakota State University, discussed a variety of topics including how the USDA Food Pyramid was developed, limitations in human nutrition research, how the US diet has evolved throughout the years, and how those changes have significant implications on human health.

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March 2016 Hogs & Pigs Report Indicates Growth in South Dakota Sow Numbers

According to Dr. Bob Thaler, SDSU Extension Swine Specialist, sow numbers in SD have increased by 15,000 sows in just the last quarter since December 2015. This is the first time since September 1995 that the USDA has reported 190,000 sows in the breeding herd inventory for South Dakota. Using a conservative number of 25 pigs/sow/year, the additional 15,000 sows will produce 375,000 pigs annually.

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Why We Should Be Eating Like a Pig

No diet has been more analyzed than the human diet. Yet health problems related to diet like obesity, diabetes and heart disease continue to plague Americans. Could the answer to solving the human diet dilemma start with pigs? The answer is yes, according to meat scientist Dr. Eric Berg. Pigs are an excellent substitute for humans when studying nutrition. “Like humans, pigs are omnivores and their anatomy and physiology are very similar,” says Berg, a professor at North Dakota State University.

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Learning from PEDv: Managing disease in manure and mortalities

The economic impact of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDv 9078) on the U.S. swine industry is estimated at around $900 billion annually since it first began infecting herds in the spring of 2013. Research on persistence of the PED virus in manure and mortality compost piles conducted by Dr. Amy Schmidt and her colleagues in the USDA-ARS and the UNL School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences was presented during the November 4th Animal Care Wednesday Webinar by Nicole Schuster, a graduate research assistant in Dr. Schmidt’s lab at UNL.

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Blister Diseases Causing Trouble for Horses and Pigs This Year

“Doctor, there’s a veterinarian on the line who wants to talk to you about some blisters he’s seeing in a group of pigs.” That doesn’t sound like a big deal, right? But if you are a regulatory veterinarian – tasked with protecting animal populations from incursions of serious diseases – this is the call you dread taking. The reason for the anxiety has to do with the most feared of foreign animal diseases – Foot and Mouth Disease. The US has not seen FMD since 1929.

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