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    Annual Forages for Feed

    With the early onset of drought, many livestock producers are concerned about feed supplies. Annual forages may be an option for producers on unplanted fields with good moisture reserves or on failed fields when soil moisture levels improve.

    Read More »

    South Dakota Climate & Drought Summary

    As of June 15, 2017, 45% of South Dakota is in drought, and an additional 35% is experiencing abnormally dry conditions. The last four weeks have been marked by rapid degradation in drought severity and extent.

    Read More »

    Potato Leafhoppers in Alfalfa: 2017 Scouting Recommendations

    The first cutting of alfalfa is either completed or underway throughout much of South Dakota. One of the pests that we are starting to observe in the alfalfa regrowth are potato leafhoppers. Although the observed populations are still low, it is important to remember that potato leafhopper feeding injury can often resemble drought conditions, which are also being experienced in many areas of the state.

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    Haying With Wildlife in Mind

    Spring rains are starting to give way to sunshine and warmer days across much of the state. This shift in the seasons has many producers looking forward to getting into the fields to start putting up hay. Anyone who has spent time cutting hay knows that hayland can be a magnet for wildlife in late spring and early summer.

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    2017 West River Field School: June 20th in Rapid City, S.D.

    The third annual SDSU West River Field School is set for June 20th and will be held at The SDSU West River Ag Center. This event is intended to provide continuing education to crop advisors and others who work with farmers and ranchers in central and western South Dakota. Attendees will have a chance to receive hands-on, in-field experience during this one-day event.

    Read More »

    How to Identify Weevils in Alfalfa

    When scouting alfalfa, there are two species of weevils that may be observed. These two species are the alfalfa weevil and the clover leaf weevil. The alfalfa weevil is known to cause serious defoliation and has the greater potential to cause yield losses. However, clover leaf weevils can also become very damaging if present in large populations. Although they are similar in size and coloration, there are some distinguishing characteristics that can be used to identify these weevil species.

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    Annual Forages for Feed

    With the early onset of drought, many livestock producers are concerned about feed supplies. Annual forages may be an option for producers on unplanted fields with good moisture reserves or on failed fields when soil moisture levels improve.

    Read More »

    South Dakota Climate & Drought Summary

    As of June 15, 2017, 45% of South Dakota is in drought, and an additional 35% is experiencing abnormally dry conditions. The last four weeks have been marked by rapid degradation in drought severity and extent.

    Read More »

    2017 West River Field School: June 20th in Rapid City, S.D.

    The third annual SDSU West River Field School is set for June 20th and will be held at The SDSU West River Ag Center. This event is intended to provide continuing education to crop advisors and others who work with farmers and ranchers in central and western South Dakota. Attendees will have a chance to receive hands-on, in-field experience during this one-day event.

    Read More »

    Field Studies: Replicated Comparisons vs. Side-by-Side Comparisons

    The season is upon us and producers are heading out to the field to get their crops planted and established. Producers are interested in knowing what works best, yields the most, and especially what is most profitable during these tight economic times. Some may want to compare products or practices on their own farm or look at information from other farms or industry studies.

    Read More »

    Can my crops take these cold temperatures?

    It has been unseasonably cold and snowy…now what? There are a few things to keep in mind as Mother Nature temporarily brought back the wrath of winter. Many farmers in Southeastern South Dakota began corn planting within the last two weeks. According to the USDA NASS, 7% of corn and 2% of soybean was planted across the state of South Dakota as of May 1.

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    Annual Forages for Feed

    With the early onset of drought, many livestock producers are concerned about feed supplies. Annual forages may be an option for producers on unplanted fields with good moisture reserves or on failed fields when soil moisture levels improve.

    Read More »

    South Dakota Climate & Drought Summary

    As of June 15, 2017, 45% of South Dakota is in drought, and an additional 35% is experiencing abnormally dry conditions. The last four weeks have been marked by rapid degradation in drought severity and extent.

    Read More »

    Cutworms Causing Issues in Western South Dakota

    Cutworms can be a serious pest of crops in South Dakota. Safflower is one of the crops recently affected by cutworms in the western half of the state. The cutworm species responsible for the reported injury was dingy cutworm. Dingy cutworms are considered sporadic pests in South Dakota, and are typically observed during the early part of the growing season. Last year, dingy cutworms were observed in several sunflower fields throughout South Dakota.

    Read More »

    2017 West River Field School: June 20th in Rapid City, S.D.

    The third annual SDSU West River Field School is set for June 20th and will be held at The SDSU West River Ag Center. This event is intended to provide continuing education to crop advisors and others who work with farmers and ranchers in central and western South Dakota. Attendees will have a chance to receive hands-on, in-field experience during this one-day event.

    Read More »

    Field Studies: Replicated Comparisons vs. Side-by-Side Comparisons

    The season is upon us and producers are heading out to the field to get their crops planted and established. Producers are interested in knowing what works best, yields the most, and especially what is most profitable during these tight economic times. Some may want to compare products or practices on their own farm or look at information from other farms or industry studies.

    Read More »

    Identifying Bacterial Blight in Field Peas

    Bacterial blight tends to show up when pea plants are damaged by rain, wind, hail or a late spring frost. Tissue damage to the plant will create a wound and the bacteria will colonize the wound. Symptoms of bacterial blight can appear on the stem, leaves and pods of the pea plants. All foliar tissue is susceptible. Initial symptoms are small shiny water soaked spots. As the disease progresses these areas can coalesce, and turn brown and necrotic.

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    Annual Forages for Feed

    With the early onset of drought, many livestock producers are concerned about feed supplies. Annual forages may be an option for producers on unplanted fields with good moisture reserves or on failed fields when soil moisture levels improve.

    Read More »

    South Dakota Climate & Drought Summary

    As of June 15, 2017, 45% of South Dakota is in drought, and an additional 35% is experiencing abnormally dry conditions. The last four weeks have been marked by rapid degradation in drought severity and extent.

    Read More »

    2017 West River Field School: June 20th in Rapid City, S.D.

    The third annual SDSU West River Field School is set for June 20th and will be held at The SDSU West River Ag Center. This event is intended to provide continuing education to crop advisors and others who work with farmers and ranchers in central and western South Dakota. Attendees will have a chance to receive hands-on, in-field experience during this one-day event.

    Read More »

    Field Studies: Replicated Comparisons vs. Side-by-Side Comparisons

    The season is upon us and producers are heading out to the field to get their crops planted and established. Producers are interested in knowing what works best, yields the most, and especially what is most profitable during these tight economic times. Some may want to compare products or practices on their own farm or look at information from other farms or industry studies.

    Read More »

    Pre-Emergence Herbicide: Why use it?

    It is always good to start with a pre-emergence chemical to help prevent weeds from becoming resistant. Usually this is a different chemistry than what you are using post-emergence. It also will buy you time on doing a post if the pre-emergence is activated. With the wet cool spring, some weeds may now have germinated before the pre-emergence product is applied after planting.

    Read More »

    Sorghum Nitrogen Rates: Comparing recommendations from standard vs. Haney soil tests

    A field scale replicated trial testing different fertilizer nitrogen rates on sorghum was conducted in Stanley County during the summer of 2016. In addition to the standard testing procedure, the laboratory also ran the Haney suite of tests. This is a set of procedures developed by Dr. Rick Haney. It is being promoted in some areas as being able to do a better job of predicting fertilizer requirements than traditional testing procedures when no-till and cover-crop techniques are being used.

    Read More »

    South Dakota Climate & Drought Summary

    As of June 15, 2017, 45% of South Dakota is in drought, and an additional 35% is experiencing abnormally dry conditions. The last four weeks have been marked by rapid degradation in drought severity and extent.

    Read More »

    Cutworms Causing Issues in Western South Dakota

    Cutworms can be a serious pest of crops in South Dakota. Safflower is one of the crops recently affected by cutworms in the western half of the state. The cutworm species responsible for the reported injury was dingy cutworm. Dingy cutworms are considered sporadic pests in South Dakota, and are typically observed during the early part of the growing season. Last year, dingy cutworms were observed in several sunflower fields throughout South Dakota.

    Read More »

    Input Costs for South Dakota Sunflowers

    Sunflowers are among the top five oilseed crops cultivated around the world. Sunflower acreage in the US. peaked in the mid to late 70’s through the mid 80’s, and then again albeit more moderately in the 90’s as a result of the Food Agricultural Conservation and Trade Act of 1990. During this century they seem to have relatively stabilized between 1.5 and 2 million acres. Reasons for this reduction have been more moderate prices resulting from larger crops abroad, and competition with soybeans as the oilseed of choice.

    Read More »

    2017 West River Field School: June 20th in Rapid City, S.D.

    The third annual SDSU West River Field School is set for June 20th and will be held at The SDSU West River Ag Center. This event is intended to provide continuing education to crop advisors and others who work with farmers and ranchers in central and western South Dakota. Attendees will have a chance to receive hands-on, in-field experience during this one-day event.

    Read More »

    Field Studies: Replicated Comparisons vs. Side-by-Side Comparisons

    The season is upon us and producers are heading out to the field to get their crops planted and established. Producers are interested in knowing what works best, yields the most, and especially what is most profitable during these tight economic times. Some may want to compare products or practices on their own farm or look at information from other farms or industry studies.

    Read More »

    Pre-Emergence Herbicide: Why use it?

    It is always good to start with a pre-emergence chemical to help prevent weeds from becoming resistant. Usually this is a different chemistry than what you are using post-emergence. It also will buy you time on doing a post if the pre-emergence is activated. With the wet cool spring, some weeds may now have germinated before the pre-emergence product is applied after planting.

    Read More »

    Compared to What? Interpreting Research Results

    In this information age, farmers may find it challenging to identify trustable sources. There are many companies trying to sell products attached to claims that may or may not be true. It is important for farmers to find a path through the hype and be able to determine if a product will benefit them or not. Statistical analysis is one way to separate fact from fiction.

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    Palmer Amaranth: Threat to South Dakota agriculture

    Annual weeds are threat to many cropping systems in South Dakota. Palmer amaranth is a newer threat in the state depending upon your geographical location. Confirmed sightings in a few counties in South Dakota include Potter, Sully, Hughes, Lyman, Bennett, Buffalo and Douglas. These are confirmed sightings and there could be other counties as well that could have Palmer amaranth in the state. Most Palmer plants found in South Dakota originated from a contaminated source, such as contaminated machinery, seed or manure. Palmer is an invasive annual plant originally from the southwestern U.S. with male and female plants.

    Read More »

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