Other Crops

Resource Library

  • Publications
  • Articles
  • Videos
  • News
  • Events

    How to Identify Weevils in Alfalfa

    When scouting alfalfa, there are two species of weevils that may be observed. These two species are the alfalfa weevil and the clover leaf weevil. The alfalfa weevil is known to cause serious defoliation and has the greater potential to cause yield losses. However, clover leaf weevils can also become very damaging if present in large populations. Although they are similar in size and coloration, there are some distinguishing characteristics that can be used to identify these weevil species.

    Read More »

    Twospotted Spider Mites in Alfalfa

    Over the last few weeks, we received reports of two spotted spider mite infestations in alfalfa. The twospotted spider mite is capable of feeding on a wide variety of plants including soybean, alfalfa, and corn. Twospotted spider mites are generally not an issue in alfalfa; however, dry conditions similar to those that have been experience in South Dakota for the last couple of weeks can allow for infestations to occur. Recent rains may help reduce the twospotted spider mite populations, but it will be very important to scout alfalfa fields to ensure that infestations do not cause yield reductions.

    Read More »

    Scouting Recommendations for Pea Aphids in Alfalfa

    While scouting alfalfa last week we observed populations of pea aphids throughout much of the field. We also received reports of fields that have a golden hue and large populations of pea aphids present in south central South Dakota. The golden hue that is being observed is due to pea aphid feeding, and is an indicator that a large population may be present. The presence of pea aphids in alfalfa is common, but if they reach large populations there is the potential for yield reductions to occur.

    Read More »

    Can my crops take these cold temperatures?

    It has been unseasonably cold and snowy…now what? There are a few things to keep in mind as Mother Nature temporarily brought back the wrath of winter. Many farmers in Southeastern South Dakota began corn planting within the last two weeks. According to the USDA NASS, 7% of corn and 2% of soybean was planted across the state of South Dakota as of May 1.

    Read More »

    Alfalfa Winter Kill: What is next?

    This year lack of snow coverage along with up’s and down’s in temperatures have caused several issues with alfalfa stands in several locations in South Dakota. Where the damage has occurred, it is concentrated in areas of fields where ice sheets formed, water ponded, poor drainage, and not enough snow cover to insulate alfalfa against extreme temperatures. Late harvested stands that are three or more years old are showing more damage than younger ones’ under moderate management.

    Read More »

    Compared to What? Interpreting Research Results

    In this information age, farmers may find it challenging to identify trustable sources. There are many companies trying to sell products attached to claims that may or may not be true. It is important for farmers to find a path through the hype and be able to determine if a product will benefit them or not. Statistical analysis is one way to separate fact from fiction.

    Read More »

    Field Studies: Replicated Comparisons vs. Side-by-Side Comparisons

    The season is upon us and producers are heading out to the field to get their crops planted and established. Producers are interested in knowing what works best, yields the most, and especially what is most profitable during these tight economic times. Some may want to compare products or practices on their own farm or look at information from other farms or industry studies.

    Read More »

    Can my crops take these cold temperatures?

    It has been unseasonably cold and snowy…now what? There are a few things to keep in mind as Mother Nature temporarily brought back the wrath of winter. Many farmers in Southeastern South Dakota began corn planting within the last two weeks. According to the USDA NASS, 7% of corn and 2% of soybean was planted across the state of South Dakota as of May 1.

    Read More »

    Compared to What? Interpreting Research Results

    In this information age, farmers may find it challenging to identify trustable sources. There are many companies trying to sell products attached to claims that may or may not be true. It is important for farmers to find a path through the hype and be able to determine if a product will benefit them or not. Statistical analysis is one way to separate fact from fiction.

    Read More »

    Palmer Amaranth: Threat to South Dakota agriculture

    Annual weeds are threat to many cropping systems in South Dakota. Palmer amaranth is a newer threat in the state depending upon your geographical location. Confirmed sightings in a few counties in South Dakota include Potter, Sully, Hughes, Lyman, Bennett, Buffalo and Douglas. These are confirmed sightings and there could be other counties as well that could have Palmer amaranth in the state. Most Palmer plants found in South Dakota originated from a contaminated source, such as contaminated machinery, seed or manure. Palmer is an invasive annual plant originally from the southwestern U.S. with male and female plants.

    Read More »

    Obtaining Private Applicator Certification or Recertification in S.D.

    Certification courses and exams are available for new and existing private pesticide applicators. Individuals needing to become certified or recertified are encouraged to attend one of the 3-hour private applicator sessions hosted throughout the state. The dates and locations of these sessions can be found in this article.

    Read More »

    USDA Provides New Cost Share Opportunities for Organic Producers & Handlers

    In recent times, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has shown increased interest in organic agriculture. As a result, on December 21, 2016, the USDA announced that starting March 20, 2017, organic producers and handlers will be able to visit over 2,100 USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices across the country to apply for federal reimbursement to assist with the cost of receiving and maintaining organic or transitional certification.

    Read More »

    Yield Goal… Truly Defined

    Whether it’s over a cup of coffee in December or back in the combine at harvest, yield is on the producer’s mind. In the spring, goals are set, plans are made, and crops are planted. Although plans are carefully drawn, we never know what might happen during a given growing season. Having measurable, specific goals for your business is always a good idea, and one of the most important goals is maximizing yields.

    Read More »

    Herbicide History Determines Seed Purchases

    Although 2016 row-crop harvest is still underway, many seed suppliers have started promoting ‘early bird’ incentives on next year’s seed purchases. We all like a good deal when we see one, but it’s important to keep track of field history, and think about your future crop rotation before making decisions.

    Read More »

    Field Studies: Replicated Comparisons vs. Side-by-Side Comparisons

    The season is upon us and producers are heading out to the field to get their crops planted and established. Producers are interested in knowing what works best, yields the most, and especially what is most profitable during these tight economic times. Some may want to compare products or practices on their own farm or look at information from other farms or industry studies.

    Read More »

    Identifying Bacterial Blight in Field Peas

    Bacterial blight tends to show up when pea plants are damaged by rain, wind, hail or a late spring frost. Tissue damage to the plant will create a wound and the bacteria will colonize the wound. Symptoms of bacterial blight can appear on the stem, leaves and pods of the pea plants. All foliar tissue is susceptible. Initial symptoms are small shiny water soaked spots. As the disease progresses these areas can coalesce, and turn brown and necrotic.

    Read More »

    Grasshopper Problems: 2017 Potential

    There are several species of grasshoppers that can negatively affect rangeland conditions in South Dakota. Grasshoppers tend to be more serious than other rangeland insect pests, and they occur most frequently. Each summer, the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) conducts surveys throughout the Western counties to monitor grasshopper population densities. These surveys focus on collecting adult grasshoppers, and the data can be used as a prediction of areas where grasshoppers may be an issue during the following year.

    Read More »

    Pasture Bugs N’ Grubs Road Show Coming to South Dakota

    Spring is arriving throughout South Dakota and it signals the return of insects to the landscape. As the snow melts, it is a time when many tasks such as calving, pasture management, and fence maintenance begin in earnest. With many pressing needs to tend to, many ranchers may not find the time to consider the role insects play on their ranch.

    Read More »

    Compared to What? Interpreting Research Results

    In this information age, farmers may find it challenging to identify trustable sources. There are many companies trying to sell products attached to claims that may or may not be true. It is important for farmers to find a path through the hype and be able to determine if a product will benefit them or not. Statistical analysis is one way to separate fact from fiction.

    Read More »

    Palmer Amaranth: Threat to South Dakota agriculture

    Annual weeds are threat to many cropping systems in South Dakota. Palmer amaranth is a newer threat in the state depending upon your geographical location. Confirmed sightings in a few counties in South Dakota include Potter, Sully, Hughes, Lyman, Bennett, Buffalo and Douglas. These are confirmed sightings and there could be other counties as well that could have Palmer amaranth in the state. Most Palmer plants found in South Dakota originated from a contaminated source, such as contaminated machinery, seed or manure. Palmer is an invasive annual plant originally from the southwestern U.S. with male and female plants.

    Read More »

    Obtaining Private Applicator Certification or Recertification in S.D.

    Certification courses and exams are available for new and existing private pesticide applicators. Individuals needing to become certified or recertified are encouraged to attend one of the 3-hour private applicator sessions hosted throughout the state. The dates and locations of these sessions can be found in this article.

    Read More »

    USDA Provides New Cost Share Opportunities for Organic Producers & Handlers

    In recent times, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has shown increased interest in organic agriculture. As a result, on December 21, 2016, the USDA announced that starting March 20, 2017, organic producers and handlers will be able to visit over 2,100 USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices across the country to apply for federal reimbursement to assist with the cost of receiving and maintaining organic or transitional certification.

    Read More »

    Field Studies: Replicated Comparisons vs. Side-by-Side Comparisons

    The season is upon us and producers are heading out to the field to get their crops planted and established. Producers are interested in knowing what works best, yields the most, and especially what is most profitable during these tight economic times. Some may want to compare products or practices on their own farm or look at information from other farms or industry studies.

    Read More »

    Pre-Emergence Herbicide: Why use it?

    It is always good to start with a pre-emergence chemical to help prevent weeds from becoming resistant. Usually this is a different chemistry than what you are using post-emergence. It also will buy you time on doing a post if the pre-emergence is activated. With the wet cool spring, some weeds may now have germinated before the pre-emergence product is applied after planting.

    Read More »

    Sorghum Nitrogen Rates: Comparing recommendations from standard vs. Haney soil tests

    A field scale replicated trial testing different fertilizer nitrogen rates on sorghum was conducted in Stanley County during the summer of 2016. In addition to the standard testing procedure, the laboratory also ran the Haney suite of tests. This is a set of procedures developed by Dr. Rick Haney. It is being promoted in some areas as being able to do a better job of predicting fertilizer requirements than traditional testing procedures when no-till and cover-crop techniques are being used.

    Read More »

    Compared to What? Interpreting Research Results

    In this information age, farmers may find it challenging to identify trustable sources. There are many companies trying to sell products attached to claims that may or may not be true. It is important for farmers to find a path through the hype and be able to determine if a product will benefit them or not. Statistical analysis is one way to separate fact from fiction.

    Read More »

    Palmer Amaranth: Threat to South Dakota agriculture

    Annual weeds are threat to many cropping systems in South Dakota. Palmer amaranth is a newer threat in the state depending upon your geographical location. Confirmed sightings in a few counties in South Dakota include Potter, Sully, Hughes, Lyman, Bennett, Buffalo and Douglas. These are confirmed sightings and there could be other counties as well that could have Palmer amaranth in the state. Most Palmer plants found in South Dakota originated from a contaminated source, such as contaminated machinery, seed or manure. Palmer is an invasive annual plant originally from the southwestern U.S. with male and female plants.

    Read More »

    2017 Weed Control: Sorghum

    The South Dakota 2017 Weed Control in Sorghum is available online as a free PDF download or as a hard copy at SDSU Extension regional centers, offices, and at events. The publication was updated for 2017 to include new products, new product names, and the corresponding changes to the labels including application rates, rotation restrictions, and additive rates. Cost estimates are included for the herbicide products.

    Read More »

    Obtaining Private Applicator Certification or Recertification in S.D.

    Certification courses and exams are available for new and existing private pesticide applicators. Individuals needing to become certified or recertified are encouraged to attend one of the 3-hour private applicator sessions hosted throughout the state. The dates and locations of these sessions can be found in this article.

    Read More »

    USDA Provides New Cost Share Opportunities for Organic Producers & Handlers

    In recent times, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has shown increased interest in organic agriculture. As a result, on December 21, 2016, the USDA announced that starting March 20, 2017, organic producers and handlers will be able to visit over 2,100 USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices across the country to apply for federal reimbursement to assist with the cost of receiving and maintaining organic or transitional certification.

    Read More »

    Field Studies: Replicated Comparisons vs. Side-by-Side Comparisons

    The season is upon us and producers are heading out to the field to get their crops planted and established. Producers are interested in knowing what works best, yields the most, and especially what is most profitable during these tight economic times. Some may want to compare products or practices on their own farm or look at information from other farms or industry studies.

    Read More »

    Pre-Emergence Herbicide: Why use it?

    It is always good to start with a pre-emergence chemical to help prevent weeds from becoming resistant. Usually this is a different chemistry than what you are using post-emergence. It also will buy you time on doing a post if the pre-emergence is activated. With the wet cool spring, some weeds may now have germinated before the pre-emergence product is applied after planting.

    Read More »

    Compared to What? Interpreting Research Results

    In this information age, farmers may find it challenging to identify trustable sources. There are many companies trying to sell products attached to claims that may or may not be true. It is important for farmers to find a path through the hype and be able to determine if a product will benefit them or not. Statistical analysis is one way to separate fact from fiction.

    Read More »

    Palmer Amaranth: Threat to South Dakota agriculture

    Annual weeds are threat to many cropping systems in South Dakota. Palmer amaranth is a newer threat in the state depending upon your geographical location. Confirmed sightings in a few counties in South Dakota include Potter, Sully, Hughes, Lyman, Bennett, Buffalo and Douglas. These are confirmed sightings and there could be other counties as well that could have Palmer amaranth in the state. Most Palmer plants found in South Dakota originated from a contaminated source, such as contaminated machinery, seed or manure. Palmer is an invasive annual plant originally from the southwestern U.S. with male and female plants.

    Read More »

    Obtaining Private Applicator Certification or Recertification in S.D.

    Certification courses and exams are available for new and existing private pesticide applicators. Individuals needing to become certified or recertified are encouraged to attend one of the 3-hour private applicator sessions hosted throughout the state. The dates and locations of these sessions can be found in this article.

    Read More »

    2017 Pest Management Guides Released

    The South Dakota 2017 Pest Management guides are available online as free PDF downloads or as hard copies at SDSU Extension Regional Centers, offices, and events. The guides provide recommendations for herbicides, insecticides, seed treatments, and fungicides that are available in South Dakota to control weeds, insects, and diseases in a variety of crops.

    Read More »

    USDA Provides New Cost Share Opportunities for Organic Producers & Handlers

    In recent times, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has shown increased interest in organic agriculture. As a result, on December 21, 2016, the USDA announced that starting March 20, 2017, organic producers and handlers will be able to visit over 2,100 USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices across the country to apply for federal reimbursement to assist with the cost of receiving and maintaining organic or transitional certification.

    Read More »

    Yield Goal… Truly Defined

    Whether it’s over a cup of coffee in December or back in the combine at harvest, yield is on the producer’s mind. In the spring, goals are set, plans are made, and crops are planted. Although plans are carefully drawn, we never know what might happen during a given growing season. Having measurable, specific goals for your business is always a good idea, and one of the most important goals is maximizing yields.

    Read More »

    Sign Up For Email!

    • Field Staff Listing
    • South Dakota 4HOnline