Beef

Resource Library

  • Publications
  • Articles
  • Videos
  • News
  • Events

    Generator Preparedness

    Tis the season for… power outages? Unfortunately, there is some truth to that statement when you live in the Midwest. The power outages that plagued northeast South Dakota over the Christmas weekend can confirm how real this scenario can be. For many homeowners a power outage may be viewed as just and inconvenience with some potential repair cost associated with it. But for a lot of livestock operations, a power outage has the potential to be a very costly event.

    Read More »

    USDA Provides New Cost Share Opportunities for Organic Producers & Handlers

    In recent times, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has shown increased interest in organic agriculture. As a result, on December 21, 2016, the USDA announced that starting March 20, 2017, organic producers and handlers will be able to visit over 2,100 USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices across the country to apply for federal reimbursement to assist with the cost of receiving and maintaining organic or transitional certification.

    Read More »

    Are your farm employees ready for low temperatures?

    Winter is here and snow and icy roads will increase the risk for accidents. Getting ready to leave the house and going to work on the snow and ice might be a problem for inexperienced people. The cold and snowy season are challenges for anyone, and especially to the immigrant workers that have to endure them.

    Read More »

    Transport Tips: Emergency Preparedness

    Dairies and cattlemen transport calves, cows and bulls routinely. Ensuring that trailers are properly prepared for transport no matter how short the distance helps stockmen be efficient and promote animal well-being while ensuring human safety. One important way to be prepared during transportation emergencies is to consider the Bovine Emergency Response Plan (BERP) curriculum.

    Read More »

    Do as I say and not as I do…

    How many times have you heard this? In regards to our communities and agricultural development we all need to remember that we are all under public scrutiny. Our actions whether a small or large producer can have monumental impact as we move forward with agriculture being the forefront of an economic base within communities and the state.

    Read More »

    Agricultural Generational Communications: Part 1

    Since generational operations are primarily family members, we assume we know all there is to know about each other, right? On the surface we probably do know some key characteristics or preferences of family members, but is that the same as knowing them at a level of working alongside or reporting to them on a daily basis.

    Read More »

    Holidays: A Time for Generations

    The holiday season is time for family. It’s an opportunity to celebrate the holidays, reunite and spend time together due to busy schedules throughout the year or who may be spread many miles apart. Historically, in agriculture farm families make up the greatest percentage of business ownership, many of which are generational family operations, two or three generations of family working side-by-side daily to produce agricultural products.

    Read More »

    Year-End Review & 2017 Planning

    The holiday season and the end of 2016 are upon us. Many newsworthy things happened in the beef cattle industry in 2016 that affected everyone in the beef business. Some were good and some were not so good, but all affected the successes of beef cattle producers throughout the year. The end of a year of managing any business, including beef cattle production, provides an opportunity to assess and evaluate how well management plans and practices worked throughout the year.

    Read More »

    Crop Livestock Integration: Another Potential Revenue Source

    According to the US Census of Agriculture, cultivable pastureland in South Dakota decreased by 22% and grazing fees per head increased 50% between 2002 and 2012. Average 2016 South Dakota pasture rental rates range from $11/acre in the northwest to near $100/acre in the southeast corner of the state. Also, cropland rental rates in the state range from $28/acre in the northwest to $244/acre in the southeast (2016 SD Ag Land Market Trends). So how do we better utilize resources to reduce expenses for both crop and livestock producers?

    Read More »

    Caring for Animals When the Power Goes Out

    The power outages experienced in areas of South Dakota might make animal caretakers wonder, “How did we ever raise livestock in the days before electricity?”  Electric lights, hot water heaters, and mechanical ventilation are all items that are taken for granted, except when weather events interrupt their supply of “juice.”

    Read More »

    Year-End Review & 2017 Planning

    The holiday season and the end of 2016 are upon us. Many newsworthy things happened in the beef cattle industry in 2016 that affected everyone in the beef business. Some were good and some were not so good, but all affected the successes of beef cattle producers throughout the year. The end of a year of managing any business, including beef cattle production, provides an opportunity to assess and evaluate how well management plans and practices worked throughout the year.

    Read More »

    Hammering Out the Details as the VFD Rule Approaches

    As the January 1, 2017 implementation date approaches, livestock producers, veterinarians, and feed distributors are gearing up to start complying with new rules regarding feed-grade antibiotics. Among some producers and veterinarians, a recent sentiment has been that the VFD rules are “changing,” leading to confusion. In reality, the VFD rules have not “changed” at all since becoming final. The rules as published, however, aren’t heavy on details. When different people interpret these details on the basis of a specific farm’s needs, different answers to the same questions can emerge, unfortunately creating more uncertainty.

    Read More »

    Net Wrap: A New Barrier

    Since the mid-1900’s, large round balers have been utilized to store hay and other forages as winter feedstuffs on cow/calf operations in the Upper Midwest. Today there are many baler options for producers to choose from with variations in size and shape of bales, as well as the type of binding. Binding has evolved from wire to twine, net wrap and even plastic bale wrappers. With advancements in binding technology, efficiency has increased when compared to twine binding.

    Read More »

    What to Expect if You Retain Ownership into a Feedyard

    Many cow-calf producers have always sold their calves at weaning. It’s fairly common to hear about retaining ownership and the opportunity it provides to add value to your cattle when market conditions are right. In fact, there have been several articles in the ag press lately suggesting that this might be a good fall to retain ownership at least through the backgrounding phase because low feed costs suggest the opportunity to feed cattle at economical costs of gain.

    Read More »

    Producers, veterinarians, and health officials becoming more aware of dairy calf Salmonellosis

    In recent months, a common cause of illness in dairy calves has been garnering more attention among calf raisers, their veterinarians, and even health departments. Salmonella infections can be some of the most severe causes of illness in calves less than one month of age. At the South Dakota Animal Disease Research and Diagnostic Lab in fiscal year 2016, Salmonella was the number one cause of bacterial septicemia (whole body infection) and was among the most common causes of diarrhea in calves.

    Read More »

    Putting the Preg Check Results to Work

    Pregnancy check day is one of the most important days on the ranch as it is the day when we find out what cows are pregnant and how many calves we can expect come calving season. So now that the veterinarian has left the yard and the open cows are sorted off, what’s next? Before throwing the preg check list on the dashboard never to be looked at again, try to reflect on the results.

    Read More »

    Generator Preparedness

    Tis the season for… power outages? Unfortunately, there is some truth to that statement when you live in the Midwest. The power outages that plagued northeast South Dakota over the Christmas weekend can confirm how real this scenario can be. For many homeowners a power outage may be viewed as just and inconvenience with some potential repair cost associated with it. But for a lot of livestock operations, a power outage has the potential to be a very costly event.

    Read More »

    Are your farm employees ready for low temperatures?

    Winter is here and snow and icy roads will increase the risk for accidents. Getting ready to leave the house and going to work on the snow and ice might be a problem for inexperienced people. The cold and snowy season are challenges for anyone, and especially to the immigrant workers that have to endure them.

    Read More »

    Caring for Animals When the Power Goes Out

    The power outages experienced in areas of South Dakota might make animal caretakers wonder, “How did we ever raise livestock in the days before electricity?”  Electric lights, hot water heaters, and mechanical ventilation are all items that are taken for granted, except when weather events interrupt their supply of “juice.”

    Read More »

    Upper Midwest Puerto Rico Collaboration: The time is now for dairy employees

    The dairy industry faces a labor shortage and with the uncertainty associated with the U.S. immigration issues, there seems to be only one direction, forward. The time has come to search for solutions and establish new collaborations. To help facilitate bringing farmers with solutions for the lack of skilled and available workers a team from SDSU Extension proposed to build a legal agreement between Puerto Rico and South Dakota.

    Read More »

    Year-End Review & 2017 Planning

    The holiday season and the end of 2016 are upon us. Many newsworthy things happened in the beef cattle industry in 2016 that affected everyone in the beef business. Some were good and some were not so good, but all affected the successes of beef cattle producers throughout the year. The end of a year of managing any business, including beef cattle production, provides an opportunity to assess and evaluate how well management plans and practices worked throughout the year.

    Read More »

    Hammering Out the Details as the VFD Rule Approaches

    As the January 1, 2017 implementation date approaches, livestock producers, veterinarians, and feed distributors are gearing up to start complying with new rules regarding feed-grade antibiotics. Among some producers and veterinarians, a recent sentiment has been that the VFD rules are “changing,” leading to confusion. In reality, the VFD rules have not “changed” at all since becoming final. The rules as published, however, aren’t heavy on details. When different people interpret these details on the basis of a specific farm’s needs, different answers to the same questions can emerge, unfortunately creating more uncertainty.

    Read More »

    Net Wrap: A New Barrier

    Since the mid-1900’s, large round balers have been utilized to store hay and other forages as winter feedstuffs on cow/calf operations in the Upper Midwest. Today there are many baler options for producers to choose from with variations in size and shape of bales, as well as the type of binding. Binding has evolved from wire to twine, net wrap and even plastic bale wrappers. With advancements in binding technology, efficiency has increased when compared to twine binding.

    Read More »

    Bring Beef to the Party!

    Tis the season for delicious cooking and while the parties are almost over, we have some ideas to help ensure you are well-equipped to bring the cheer to your New Year’s Eve party. Whether you have a date for a big bash or will ring in New Year a little more low-key with family and friends, when you arrive with a delicious beef appetizer recipe in hand, you’ll be sure to put the “happy” in “Happy New Year!”

    Read More »

    Prime Rib Roast: Mastering a Holiday Classic

    It is a holiday classic and creates an amazing centerpiece for a holiday meal. But cooking a prime rib roast can be unnerving at best for some. Especially if they feel the added pressure to impress guests. The good news is – prime rib’s “wow” factor doesn’t mean it cooking it must be complicated or difficult.

    Read More »

    How Do Genetics Impact Animal Well-Being?

    During the October Animal Care Wednesday Webinar, Dr. Michael Gonda, South Dakota State University Associate Professor of Animal Genetics, discussed the difficult topic of the impacts that genetic technologies have on food animal farming and ranching. Genetic engineering (GE) refers to the insertion, deletion, or modification of a specific region of DNA in an organism.

    Read More »

    Superbugs from Livestock Care Practices?

    During the September Animal Care Wednesday Webinar, Dr. Gretchen Hill, Michigan State University Professor of Nutrition, began her presentation regarding antibiotic resistant bacteria with a powerful statement highlighting a misconception of society that current livestock care practices could be producing an unsafe food source.

    Read More »

    Brazil and the U.S. Resuming Beef Trade

    The USDA recently announced that an agreement has been reached with Brazil’s Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply to allow access for U.S. beef to the Brazilian market. This is the first time that U.S. beef has been approved for export to Brazil since the diagnosis of a bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)-positive cow in 2003. Brazil’s actions reflect the fact that the U.S. is now under the ‘negligible risk classification’ for BSE by the World Organization for Animal Health.

    Read More »

    So You Think You Want to Raise Backyard Chickens?

    As families desire to raise their own food, more people are beginning to raise chickens and other poultry in urban and suburban areas. When people bring poultry into communities and their backyards, issues can arise. Dr. Jacquie Jacob, University of Kentucky Poultry Extension Project Manager, presented some of these challenges during the August Animal Care Wednesday Webinar.

    Read More »

    Is it Done Yet? How to determine meat is cooked properly

    “Is it done yet?” We all ask this question when cooking and there are a variety of methods that have been passed down to determine the ‘doneness’ of different products. For example, my grandmother taught me to throw spaghetti against the wall and if it sticks to the wall it’s done. In later years I’ve learned that although this method is fun to implement, it really just results in sticky walls and overdone pasta.

    Read More »

    Breakfast with Lean Beef

    Summer break is nearly over, and soon life will again be full of running kids to school and often extracurricular actives before and after class. Families are more on the move and in motion more than ever before, and even though schedules may be hectic, it’s important to not lose breakfast in the interest of time.

    Read More »

    Checking in on the Checkoff: Events & Happenings

    Where has the summer gone? Many of us find ourselves asking this question as we prepare to send kids back to school and look toward fall harvest and weaning. It is a busy time of year and this summer has been a whirlwind of activity in the South Dakota Beef Industry Council (SDBIC) office. Although grilling season was a prime focus and hundreds of recipes and preparation tips were shared, the staff continued to take a well-rounded approach in developing a structure that focuses on the needs of the producer, consumer, industry partners, and stakeholders.

    Read More »

    Give the Gift of Conservation This Christmas

    The SDSU Natural Resources Management Department and SDSU Extension would like to wish all our readers a Merry Christmas and remind everyone that if you are shopping for a late holiday gift, consider giving the gift of conservation to yourself or someone else.

    Read More »

    Strategic & Scenario Planning in Ranching: Conducting a Ranch Inventory - Part 2

    Following up on "Strategic & Scenario Planning in Ranching: Conducting a Ranch Inventory - Part 1," this article discusses the three remaining categories of the ranch inventory: financial, human and physical resources. Knowing the financial condition of the ranch is critical when negotiation new operating notes, new loans for diversification, or possibly making room for a son or daughter returning to the ranch.

    Read More »

    Prairie Dog Management in South Dakota

    Prairie dogs are highly social animals belonging to the squirrel family. There are five species of prairie dogs in North America. It is the black-tailed prairie dog with its tan color and short black tipped tail, that resides in South Dakota. Prairie dogs are an important component of the grassland ecosystem, providing habitat to numerous plant and animal species. They can consume or damage large amounts of vegetation and become a problem for livestock producers when they compete with livestock for forage.

    Read More »

    Welded connections and shallow bury pasture pipe offers alternative to above ground systems

    Above ground systems offer a great amount of flexibility in delivering water and options for changing pasture designs over time or space. They have also become increasingly popular with the advances in solar water and fence technology along with an increasing number of producers preferring to rotate livestock more often. Quick compression fittings and a variety of adapters for several thread types allow for excellent flexibility. However, some producers do not desire to maintain as much flexibility in their systems, and for those individuals more permanent options exist without going to a deep-bury system.

    Read More »

    Recent changes in above-ground pasture pipe requires matching pipe and fittings correctly

    Above ground water systems have become a very popular tool to deliver clean water from reliable sources to pastures across South Dakota. Recently, there have been some changes in manufacturing and suppliers that are worthy of note as producers and suppliers design systems. We wanted to share an example of a recent above ground pasture pipe installation project SDSU Extension assisted with.

    Read More »

    Crop Livestock Integration: Another Potential Revenue Source

    According to the US Census of Agriculture, cultivable pastureland in South Dakota decreased by 22% and grazing fees per head increased 50% between 2002 and 2012. Average 2016 South Dakota pasture rental rates range from $11/acre in the northwest to near $100/acre in the southeast corner of the state. Also, cropland rental rates in the state range from $28/acre in the northwest to $244/acre in the southeast (2016 SD Ag Land Market Trends). So how do we better utilize resources to reduce expenses for both crop and livestock producers?

    Read More »

    New SDSU Extension report provides status of native grasslands & woodlands in Eastern S.D.

    SDSU Extension, in partnership with a variety of non-government, state, and federal agencies, has recently released a public report on the status of native plant communities in Eastern South Dakota. The report is based on a comprehensive look at the Eastern South Dakota landscape that incorporated the use of field and tract-level historic Farm Service Agency (FSA) cropland history, coupled with high resolution aerial photographs provided through the USDA National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP).

    Read More »

    Sign Up For Email!

    • Field Staff Listing
    • South Dakota 4HOnline