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    Horse Nutrition Basics on a Budget

    During the June 7th Animal Care Wednesday Webinar, basic equine nutrition on a budget was the topic. Dr. Bob Coleman, Equine Extension Specialist with University of Kentucky, discussed the various considerations horse owners should evaluate when making feed decisions since feed costs are the major portion of the annual cost of a horse.

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    Bovine Emergency Response Plan (BERP) Program

    The scene of an accident is not the place to build your team! The BERP program was the featured discussion for the May Animal Care Wednesday Webinar. Lisa Pederson with North Dakota State University discussed how and why the program began, who the audience is for the program, and the impact this program is having.

    Read More »

    Farm Animal Antibiotic Resistance and Stewardship

    During the February 1st Animal Care Wednesday Webinar, we heard one of the leading experts discuss the challenging social concerns of antibiotic resistance. Michael Apley, Frick Professor of Clinical Sciences with the Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, challenged listeners to better understand the difference between judicious use and stewardship of antibiotics by reviewing the many factors involved in epidemiology (study of incidence, distribution, and possible control of diseases).

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    Congenital Limb Deformities in Horses

    This article discusses congenital deformities in horses. “Congenital” refers to a condition that is present from birth. “Deformity” refers to the state of being malformed or misshapen. This discussion will focus on conformation, health, and well-being aspects affected by congenital deformities in horses. There are many congenital deformities, but we will focus on contracted flexor tendons and angular limb deformities.

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    Equine Viral Arteritis

    Equine viral arteritis (EVA) is a viral infection of horses caused by the equine arteritis virus. EVA leads to respiratory illness, inflammation, bleeding, and abortion in pregnant mares, creating significant economic losses to the equine industry. The disease is caused by an enveloped RNA virus, which infects equine species. The virus is environmentally sensitive, meaning that it is generally not able to persist outside of the horse, though it can persist longer in a cold environment.

    Read More »

    New Concepts in Parasite Control in Adult Horses

    Recommendations for intestinal parasite control in adult horses are changing. These changes are based on new evidence for the types of parasites commonly affecting horses as well as the development of parasite populations that are becoming resistant to treatment with an anthelmintic (de-wormer). Evidence now exists to suggest that adult horses tend to vary greatly in both their susceptibility to parasites as well as in their tendency to shed, or release parasite eggs into the environment.

    Read More »

    Equitarian Initiative 2016 Costa Rica Workshop: Perspectives of an SDSU student

    On January 22, 2016, Dr. Becky Bott and two undergraduate students, Jordan Nichols and Brittney Schlaikjer, traveled to Costa Rica to do just that. These SDSU delegates, along with many other students, veterinarians and veterinary techs, joined the Equitarian Initiative 2016 Workshop in Costa Rica and spent 9 days working in the blistering Costa Rican heat treating the working equids of the country.

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    Stall Flooring for the Equine Barn

    An equine facility that is energy efficient, safe, labor efficient, and economically possible is desirable. To achieve each of these qualities one must consider the facility in terms of each of its smaller segments, such as flooring, stall design, arena footing, fencing and building materials. After researching the possibilities, the builder has the ability to select the best possible combination for the facility. 

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    The Blanketing Dilemma: When to use blankets

    Many people often picture winter as a fun time, when they are able to enjoy the glistening snowflakes and winter sports. However, when most horse owners think of winter, they think of added work: scooping snow, chopping ice, and other winter chores. Cold temperatures require many horse owners in the Midwest to trade in their horses’ flysheets for winter blankets. However, some horse owners believe it is better not to blanket horses, letting their natural hair coat provide protection from the cold.

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    Do as I say and not as I do…

    How many times have you heard this? In regards to our communities and agricultural development we all need to remember that we are all under public scrutiny. Our actions whether a small or large producer can have monumental impact as we move forward with agriculture being the forefront of an economic base within communities and the state.

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    Superbugs from Livestock Care Practices?

    During the September Animal Care Wednesday Webinar, Dr. Gretchen Hill, Michigan State University Professor of Nutrition, began her presentation regarding antibiotic resistant bacteria with a powerful statement highlighting a misconception of society that current livestock care practices could be producing an unsafe food source.

    Read More »

    Congenital Limb Deformities in Horses

    This article discusses congenital deformities in horses. “Congenital” refers to a condition that is present from birth. “Deformity” refers to the state of being malformed or misshapen. This discussion will focus on conformation, health, and well-being aspects affected by congenital deformities in horses. There are many congenital deformities, but we will focus on contracted flexor tendons and angular limb deformities.

    Read More »

    Equine Viral Arteritis

    Equine viral arteritis (EVA) is a viral infection of horses caused by the equine arteritis virus. EVA leads to respiratory illness, inflammation, bleeding, and abortion in pregnant mares, creating significant economic losses to the equine industry. The disease is caused by an enveloped RNA virus, which infects equine species. The virus is environmentally sensitive, meaning that it is generally not able to persist outside of the horse, though it can persist longer in a cold environment.

    Read More »

    New Concepts in Parasite Control in Adult Horses

    Recommendations for intestinal parasite control in adult horses are changing. These changes are based on new evidence for the types of parasites commonly affecting horses as well as the development of parasite populations that are becoming resistant to treatment with an anthelmintic (de-wormer). Evidence now exists to suggest that adult horses tend to vary greatly in both their susceptibility to parasites as well as in their tendency to shed, or release parasite eggs into the environment.

    Read More »

    Congenital Limb Deformities in Horses

    This article discusses congenital deformities in horses. “Congenital” refers to a condition that is present from birth. “Deformity” refers to the state of being malformed or misshapen. This discussion will focus on conformation, health, and well-being aspects affected by congenital deformities in horses. There are many congenital deformities, but we will focus on contracted flexor tendons and angular limb deformities.

    Read More »

    Equine Viral Arteritis

    Equine viral arteritis (EVA) is a viral infection of horses caused by the equine arteritis virus. EVA leads to respiratory illness, inflammation, bleeding, and abortion in pregnant mares, creating significant economic losses to the equine industry. The disease is caused by an enveloped RNA virus, which infects equine species. The virus is environmentally sensitive, meaning that it is generally not able to persist outside of the horse, though it can persist longer in a cold environment.

    Read More »

    State 4-H Horse Show: Advance access to show patterns creates positive experiences

    The South Dakota State 4-H Horse show is an opportunity for youth to demonstrate new and improved horsemanship skills. Despite the fact that the event is designed to be youth-oriented and that it involves horses, horse shows can, at times, provide a source of stress for contestants. One possible cause for stress is that youth need to learn horse show patterns; historically, these patterns were often posted within hours of the start of the show.

    Read More »

    Equitarian Initiative 2016 Costa Rica Workshop: Perspectives of an SDSU student

    On January 22, 2016, Dr. Becky Bott and two undergraduate students, Jordan Nichols and Brittney Schlaikjer, traveled to Costa Rica to do just that. These SDSU delegates, along with many other students, veterinarians and veterinary techs, joined the Equitarian Initiative 2016 Workshop in Costa Rica and spent 9 days working in the blistering Costa Rican heat treating the working equids of the country.

    Read More »

    Animal Well-being in South Dakota: Survey closes June 30th

    The SDSU Extension team is conducting a survey to investigate questions about the current level of care being offered to animals and the perceptions people have about animal well-being in South Dakota. The goal of the survey is to gain understanding about the current perceptions of animal well-being in South Dakota, with an emphasis on horses. As the study continues, additional information on other livestock species may be collected.

    Read More »

    We Need Your Help: Investigating Animal Well-being in South Dakota

    What is the current level of care being offered to animals in South Dakota? What perceptions about animal well-being exist in South Dakota? What educational resources are you looking for to learn more about animal well-being and on-farm care? Are you curious to know the answers? So are we.

    Read More »

    Horse Nutrition Basics on a Budget

    During the June 7th Animal Care Wednesday Webinar, basic equine nutrition on a budget was the topic. Dr. Bob Coleman, Equine Extension Specialist with University of Kentucky, discussed the various considerations horse owners should evaluate when making feed decisions since feed costs are the major portion of the annual cost of a horse.

    Read More »

    Bovine Emergency Response Plan (BERP) Program

    The scene of an accident is not the place to build your team! The BERP program was the featured discussion for the May Animal Care Wednesday Webinar. Lisa Pederson with North Dakota State University discussed how and why the program began, who the audience is for the program, and the impact this program is having.

    Read More »

    What’s going on with U.S. “Ag Gag” laws?

    During the April 5th Animal Care Wednesday Webinar, we received updates regarding “ag gag” litigation in the United States. Dave Aiken, Agricultural Law Specialist with University of Nebraska-Lincoln, discussed the most recent farm animal legislation trends and cases, which states are involved, and considerations for the sensitive topics.

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    Tips for Feeding Poultry Wisely

    During the March 1st Animal Care Wednesday Webinar, we learned the basics of feeding poultry. Brett Kreifels, Extension Assistant-4-H with University of Nebraska-Lincoln, explained the nutritional requirements and basic feeding tips to help ensure the health and well-being of chickens.

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    How Do Genetics Impact Animal Well-Being?

    During the October Animal Care Wednesday Webinar, Dr. Michael Gonda, South Dakota State University Associate Professor of Animal Genetics, discussed the difficult topic of the impacts that genetic technologies have on food animal farming and ranching. Genetic engineering (GE) refers to the insertion, deletion, or modification of a specific region of DNA in an organism.

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    Farm Safety: Making it a daily habit

    We know that agriculture ranks as one of the most dangerous occupations causing an estimated 167 lost-work-time injuries on a daily basis, of which 5% result in permanent impairment, according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. In addition, approximately 20 farm workers per 100,000 die annually, with the leading cause of these deaths being tractor overturns.

    Read More »

    Superbugs from Livestock Care Practices?

    During the September Animal Care Wednesday Webinar, Dr. Gretchen Hill, Michigan State University Professor of Nutrition, began her presentation regarding antibiotic resistant bacteria with a powerful statement highlighting a misconception of society that current livestock care practices could be producing an unsafe food source.

    Read More »

    Extending a Gait

    In many horse show patterns, the judge will challenge the competitors by asking for an extension of a walk, trot, or canter. Extending a gait involves engaging the hind end of the horse so they can lengthen their stride while still being supple through their body. This should not cause the rhythm or speed of the gait to change in any way. Extension is the lengthening of a stride, not the quickening of the stride.

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    Turning on the Forehand

    A turn on the forehand is an advanced maneuver for horses and riders. A definition provided by George Morris says, “This exercise means that the horse’s haunches move in a circular track around the forehand, which remains close to stationary and acts almost as a pivot." Turning on the forehand is similar to a turn on the haunches, but the front hoof on the side you are turning towards becomes the pivot point.

    Read More »

    State 4-H Horse Show: Advance access to show patterns creates positive experiences

    The South Dakota State 4-H Horse show is an opportunity for youth to demonstrate new and improved horsemanship skills. Despite the fact that the event is designed to be youth-oriented and that it involves horses, horse shows can, at times, provide a source of stress for contestants. One possible cause for stress is that youth need to learn horse show patterns; historically, these patterns were often posted within hours of the start of the show.

    Read More »

    An Aid for Preparing Livestock Judging Oral Reasons

    Giving reasons is one of the most useful things you will have the opportunity to do while judging livestock. Preparing and giving reasons helps develop memory and public speaking skills, all while participating in an industry based activity. However, regardless of if you are just starting or at the college level, they can be a tough task to complete and be successful at. This article will give you a better understanding of how to accomplish the experience and score you wish to achieve. 

    Read More »

    Animal Well-being in South Dakota: Survey closes June 30th

    The SDSU Extension team is conducting a survey to investigate questions about the current level of care being offered to animals and the perceptions people have about animal well-being in South Dakota. The goal of the survey is to gain understanding about the current perceptions of animal well-being in South Dakota, with an emphasis on horses. As the study continues, additional information on other livestock species may be collected.

    Read More »

    We Need Your Help: Investigating Animal Well-being in South Dakota

    What is the current level of care being offered to animals in South Dakota? What perceptions about animal well-being exist in South Dakota? What educational resources are you looking for to learn more about animal well-being and on-farm care? Are you curious to know the answers? So are we.

    Read More »

    Equine Seminar: Growing Through Knowledge

    An equine seminar was hosted on the campus of South Dakota State University August 16. The seminar, hosted by Extension Equine Specialist, Dr. Becky Bott, was comprised of eight seminars given by experts from around the U.S. The topics of rotational grazing and nutritional benefits of pastures were discussed by Laura Kenny and Dr. Carey Williams of Rutgers, New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.

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    Livestock Husbandry & Handling Workshop: Dr. Temple Grandin in Watertown, SD

    South Dakota is a strong agricultural state with large numbers of livestock being raised by farmers and ranchers. On August 5, 2014, Dr. Temple Grandin will be back in South Dakota for the second Raising the Best: Livestock Husbandry and Handling for Today’s Market workshop this summer held in Watertown, SD. This workshop is hosted by South Dakota Farmers Union in partnership with SDSU Extension. The workshop is made possible by a grant through the USDA.

    Read More »

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